The Short List – Gareth Hopkins (@grthink)

Disclosure – I have worked with Gareth on a contributor’s copy only zine before and am currently working with him on an anthology planned to release in June.

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ZL –  I believe you started out drawing for fashion zines before moving on to drawing comic zines. Why the move to comic zines?

GH – I wasn’t doing fashion zines, but rather fashion illustration for Amelia’s Magazine. I’d already started working on The Intercorstal – I’d done 30 or so pages, I think? – but was looking for new challenges, and Amelia’s Magazine was a great place to do fashion and editorial illustrations. There’d be a call out from either Amelia herself or one of the writers, and you’d either get some reference or a list of things to Google, then given a day or so to come up with an image. It was a challenge at the time because I was always trying to do comicsy art, which sometimes worked really well (like when I did some illustrations of Tony & Guy which were very heavily trying to be Indigo Prime)

Toni-Guy-SS12-tall2-by-Gareth-A-Hopkins
Toni & Guy illustration by Gareth for Amelia’s Magazine

but sometimes went against the grain of what the magazine’s aesthetic. Not a lot directly came out of working with Amelia’s (some people were able to make the jump to commercial illustration jobs), but I got some hard lessons in prepping artwork for print (I was in the Compendium Of Fashion Illustration, but had never used CMYK before), made some great friends, and got really comfortable with working quickly.

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

GH – I don’t really remember it but… there’s one panel from Revere, (by John Smith and Simon Harrison, appeared in 2000AD in the 90s) that sat in the back of my brain for years and years. It was the silhouette of a hand against the static of a TV, and the main character was trying to do some kind of magic spell using the static as a portal.

revere written in water crop
Revere Written by John Smith Art by Simon Harrison Published in 2000AD

In my brain it took up half a page, but when I re-read the comic 20-odd years later it was a tiny, incidental panel. There was just something about it that my brain glommed onto.

 

ZL – Given an unlimited budget and all the time in the world, what would be the project you’d make to be remembered by?

GH – So much of my work is the result of constraints – time, space, materials – that I don’t know what I’d do with unlimited resources. I’d definitely go large, make some kind of immersive environment, like MeowWolf, and I’d also like to make it collaborative somehow… but I don’t know if it would be memorable? Also… in general I think ‘Complete Creative Freedom’ makes people lazy. I can’t think of any situation where someone was given complete creative freedom where their art was better than when there were limits imposed — limits of budget, or content, or scale. Really good art, as far as I can tell (and I stand to be corrected) is always pushing against something.

 

ZL – You have quite a long history in the small press/ zine scene now, with a history of style shifts as well. Is there a style you’ve left behind that you feel revisiting would reap interesting rewards?

GH – Well, I’d sort of left behind the old ‘Intercorstal style’, which was very tight and careful, during ‘Found Forest Floor‘ which was very impulsive and loose, but made an intentional return to it when I worked on The Intercorstal: Extension. For anyone unfamiliar with how I made it, I’d done a project called ‘The Intercorstal 2’ 

which involved abstracting existing comics (by other artists that I liked) and also doing my own pages to the same format and dimensions. I’d been selling the results of that as a zine, but one time when I printed it out got the settings wrong and instead printed each A5 page in the middle of an A4 sheet. I didn’t want to waste the paper, so I decided to carry on the pages by filling out the space to either side of that, literally having to re-learn the styles and techniques I’d been using previously. There are some styles I can’t return to though… ‘Too Dry To Rot’ was originally intended as a return to the first Intercorstal pages that I’d done, but has since become a total rejection of them.

 

ZL – You have a graphic novel, Petrichor, out with Good Comics.  What image from this work would you choose to have tattooed on your back?

GH -I don’t know if there are any images from it that are defined enough to become tattoos. They’re so abstract that they’re more… audio than visual? Like, they give a sense of feeling, rather than being something identifiable to ‘read’ (which isn’t the same for many of my other comics, I should point out, where I’ve carefully constructed the images to work visually).

Petrichor page
Petrichor page

 

 

If I was going to get anything from Petrichor tattooed it’d be one of the repeating phrases, of which there’s a few to choose from. If it was to be tattooed somewhere where I’d see it, like on a forearm, I might go with ‘Vent Axia’…. but if it’s on my back it’s more for other people’s benefit, so I’d go with ‘It’s Easy To Forget How Many Times You’ve Fallen In Love’.

 

 

 

 

Intercorstal: Extension Review

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

Review – Drawn Poorly Zine – Identity

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This is an interesting zine for me.

It’s one that’s as much ‘what I bring to the party’ as it is one that is about the work itself.  I’m going to get a mildly philosophical, political and personal – so be warned!

There’s a discussion to have here about the project itself, around purpose and worth. This includes the wider discussion about identity and what that means and is at points in life.

A separate discussion about the actual physical issue and its content is needed as well.

 

My identity and chronic illness, or; identity, it’s not for everyone

Oddly, for someone who’s pretty healthy currently, my life has a few eras of chronic illness that mark my identity. I’m not sure I should delve too much about these matters as that’s not really the point of a review, to talk about myself in detail, is it? Yet, considering the project, I think it is the point, will I find my reflection or feel left out?

There are pieces in here that are so close to the bone of my own experiences that I’m never going to manage any kind of distance to discuss quality. However, there’s an argument to make about the worth of that experience in itself, (which I’ll make shortly).

Starting at the macro then; philosophically I have an issue with the conception of identity in and of itself. It’s one of those reductive concepts that imply a person is a thing and a thing is a single whole. By which I mean, to be personal for a second, people often believe a way of feeling or an experience means you have AN identity. I’m a white, middle-class man. That’s apparently AN identity, except, I’m someone who has mental health issues and I’m someone with a history of chronic illness and I’m someone who parents a child with chronic illness and that child happens to have learning difficulties. Oh, and I grew up as the child of hippies in a working-class area, in the 80’s in Wales, in a post-industrial town. So where do I have my IDENTITY in that, as opposed to talking about the experiences that have shaped me as a person?

Also, there’s the opposite side of this which talks about the identity of a group as if it’s all the same for each one. What is the identity of those with learning difficulties, for example, it’s different for my child than it is for someone with autism or downs syndrome. I’m pretty sure the experience of a person in America is different from a person in the UK, especially, getting back to subject, when it comes to chronic illness, because at least we in the UK don’t have to worry about paying for our medication or suffering or dying because we can’t. That’s a real and true issue in America.

There’s the further issue of awareness outside of that identity group. I wonder how many people could even conjure an understanding of why I’d mention growing up in Wales in the 80’s without just thinking about neon wearing kids dancing to Duran Duran, because, you know THE 80’S. I’ll tell you, that’s literally NOT what it was like then and gives the absolutely the wrong image of what it was. So, as I say, identity is just a great way to allow stereotyping, misconception and failed understanding. Even with good intentions. I’ll also call out identity as a renamed bigotry in certain hands. Everyone knows disabled people are in wheelchairs, so only wheelchair users are disabled? Sound familiar? Thought it yourself? I encounter exactly that attitude every day.

I guess what I’m trying to say is that identity sounds simple, but I believe it is essentialist, reductive, stereotyping and exclusionary more often than not.

I’ve had a 6 month long stay in hospital because of a childhood illness, I’ve had nearly 9 months in a hospital hospice because of my first child’s initial health issues. So am I the parent who was a sick child, the parent of a sick child, the parent (who was a sick child) of a sick child. Where does my niche go and where does my experience fail to meet the description and purpose and in failing to meet that do I end up feeling like my IDENTITY is not true, angry at not seeing myself represented?

Mission Statement
Mission Statement

Am I seeing too narrow a stereotype or caricature and what is the impact of that being delivered to the public as well? Will they, the inexperienced, limit themselves by only understanding the issue as represented here?

That really is the matter for the project to consider and the yard stick against which to measure it. How does it deal with these matters of representation, of diversity, of essentially becoming a gate keeper simply by existing!?

That’s a heavy matter, particularly considering who it is trying to represent, people already suffering in life in some way, shape or form.

 

The Project

I can see why the first issue dealt with identity. It’s a matter of setting out your stall, delivering your agenda for all to see. It really does need to be up front, because it really does tell you whether you’re in or out of this project. I know I keep banging on about this, and I’ll get to it, honestly!

First though I want to talk about another matter of inclusivity outside of the politics of representation. Does the zine communicate effectively with people who have a wide range of need, including some who may have learning difficulties? Can it deal with all of these when it is a project that relies upon open submissions? Particularly when it’s dealing with the cross-over of chronic illness and artistic expression?

I think they’ve done some very clever things that mean that this project is accessible to a wide range of needs. I’m know for certain that some of these works by themselves would communicate to my child with learning difficulties. Yet the editorial approach has made the issues raised in those works accessible to them. I’m no mind reader so I won’t claim to know whether they planned that or came upon those solutions by other routes. In the end that’s not what matters, it’s accessible in a very clever and low-key manner. I want to pick up on that here, because I think it speaks clearly about the strength of this project, it’s humanity and openess.

On the second inside page they have a whole series of speech balloons summarising the content and opinions of those present in the zine. Pithy little comments that give quick insights into their experiences. It’s a clever way of priming people to the content they’re about to encounter.

Speech Balloon Summary
Speech Balloon Summaries

It’s also a good way of making some of the internal, often expressionistic or abstract work, more accessible to those who can’t understand complex abstract ideas. It means that, although certain work will never mean much to my child, I can still have a conversation around the subject that it deals with. It frees the art up to be expressive, whilst still highlighting the content in a way that’s not forced or invasive to the art.

I’m also pleased that it’s meeting its own criteria of talking about both chronic illness and art dealing with chronic illness. The art is served well, with good reproduction and the physical item itself is on lovely paper with decent printing. More importantly, to me, it’s cleanly laid out and well labelled with details of the contributors, so it’s easy enough to go and find out more about their work if you want to. Simply put, it’s a well put together package, well edited to make it as accessible as a resource as well as a magazine to be enjoyed in and of itself. The mix and pacing of image and text is also well handled.

The project is also an interesting manner of dealing with chronic illness, dealing with aspects of daily life as well as more philosophical matters, for example, the second issue deals with having a sex life with a chronic illness. Identity is an interesting point, but it’s very BIG PICTURE. Sometimes you just want to know how to live through a day and the philosophy of it all matters much less.

I can imagine these being a great resource both online and within hospitals. A good library of these dealing with the philosophical and practical matters of life will make a good companion for someone dealing with chronic illness in their life, whether their own or someone else’s. Considering the subject, I think that’s important and appropriate. What’s the point in having this if it’s not a resource to help those it’s talking about.

 

The Issue

So, finally, to talk about what’s in here on both the macro and micro scale, by which I mean – how well do I think it deals with the issue of identity and the associated matter of representation and what do I feel after reading the contributions included in here.

Well, firstly, some pieces are privileged with the nature of my own experience reflecting their content. There are those that aren’t and are still fascinating and there are those that aren’t my sort of thing. That’s again a ‘me’ thing though.

There’s a diverse range of experience. There are pieces that are short and blunt, some more like memoir. What all of them have in common, is that they talk about the personal, not the abstract. These are about PEOPLE talking about their experiences. Really, that’s how it gets around the matter of philosophy and politics. Everything is grounded in people and their experiences. The editorial team also take great care to identify that they are trying to reach out to as diverse a population as possible. The content is treated with respect, but the editorial tone is light, open and welcoming. It’s an encouraging approach, not a distancing one.

There is a work in here that I found fascinating as an artwork communicating the intangible. It tries to make visible the invisible and uses such a beautifully simple idea it’s almost poetic. Considering that the solution is crumpled pieces of paper, I’m genuinely surprised by how visually interesting it is as well. I’m intrigued to see more, just because I can buy into that simple visual communication. It makes it very quick to get an insight into how day to day life can be for that person and for all suffers of endometriosis.

It also speaks of how different approaches can evoke different reactions in different people for different reasons. A piece like that, so abstract and so different from my experiences. My access into that is very much an appreciation of it as a method of communication, it’s an intellectual reaction entirely.

Very early on in this review I raised my own question about seeing myself reflected in pieces and how that skewed my ‘critical’ reaction to them, and what that meant within the context of this zine.

Front Cover
Front Cover – Indentity

Well, I think it speaks volumes that there are pieces, dealing with people’s experiences of illness that are not mine, that can still evoke or trigger recognition in me. In particular there is a very succinct piece (similar in visual style to the cover) that so sharply reflected one of the worst experiences of my child’s early illness that I was nearly shocked to tears at the memory.

I think it’s that recognition that gives this zine it’s power. I get to see someone whose illness, whose circumstances aren’t my own, reflecting my own feelings, so I get to see that not everything I experienced is niche, is my burden and mine alone. I think that I’m never going to identify with identity, but I can experience the sense of belonging to a community with shared experiences. Really, that’s the greatest comfort you can offer anyone who feels isolated and alone, the opportunity to recognise that there’s a community of people just like them in the world, even though they are not like them. This project delivers on that opportunity.

The Short List – Lucy Sullivan

 

Disclosure – I’ve worked with Lucy on a small, contributor only zine in the past

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L-Sullivan-Pic
Lucy Sullivan thinking hard

ZL –  When and why did you begin creating comics?

LS – I’ve been making them on & off for myself since I started reading them. In the early days that’d be in honour of strips in the papers & anthology comics like Deadline & 2000AD but I showed this to almost no-one. I started making them to be read in 2016. I’d been trying to get BARKING off the ground after my friend Nick Abadzis encouraged me to do it but it took having my daughter in 2014 & (frustratingly at the time) losing work opportunities, so I found I had time on my hands. That’s never good with a mind like mine but then suddenly realised I could be using it to finally make comics. It seems ridiculous now that it took so long to get round to it but I had to commit myself fully to the practice and start figuring out what I had to say.

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

LS – I was really taken in by an early love of female lead stories, comic shops were pretty unfriendly at the time so I took great comfort in reading ‘Tank Girl’ and ‘Halo Jones‘ but pretty much anything with artwork by Dave McKean was devoured over. A key read for me was ‘Signal To Noise’ (Gaiman/ McKean/ Ballamy) it’s a powerhouse team creating an extraordinary tale from inside one man’s thoughts as he comes to terms with his mortality. It changed everything I thought about comics & made me want to improve my skills drastically to create work that powerful.

 

ZL – Given an unlimited budget and all the time in the world, what would be the project you’d make to be remembered by?

LS – The deep seated wish for Barking would be a combined graphic novel & Animated Feature Film. It would be entirely hand drawn animation & shot on a rostrum camera with every music clearance I needed to get across the inspirations behind it. I would  Location-Print draft in some favourite creators in both comics and animation to help create it together or do it all myself because sadly I am that much of a control freak. That will probably be my epitaph.

 

ZL – You have a history in animation, do you feel that has an impact on the way you draw action?

LS – Yes, hugely. My brain is hard wired for motion. I can’t help it. I spend most of my time trying to work out which key pose would best describe the animation in my head. It’s incredibly satisfying when you get that moment right & horribly frustrating when you can’t. Key poses are at the root of 2D animation and working in the form taught me how a simple line can say so much. I’ve still got a lot to learn about the pacing and pagination of making comics. Although the volume of work to animate is intense the framing seems lazy in comparison. No matter what, you’re dealing with just a rectangle. It’s been a lot of fun playing with the page format, seeing how far I can push it but still make the story readable, at least I hope so.1in4zine

 

ZL – What single creation would you settle down with and just chill?

LS – Arrgghh, this is almost cruel. I tend to flit around genres & formats. Often reading 2 or 3 at a time. I’d love to get through my reading pile which is in 4 (growing) sections: Small Press, Graphic Novels, Literary & Academic. But if I had to choose I’ve just started ‘Gideon Falls’ (Lemire/ Sorrentino/ Stewart) it’s a cracker of a tale & gorgeously rendered, the art & colour is reminiscent of ‘Button Man’, plus it’s a huge collection already so lots to read. Or if I’m feeling focused I’d attempt to get through the entire ‘Akira’ Manga Collection. Otomo is a massive influence on my work, I can never tire of his draftsmanship. Or if I’m in a perverse mood the full ‘Twin Peaks’ output. Yup, that’ll keep me well occupied!

 

 

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

The Short List – NiceZines

Nice Zines Logo

nicezines – shout outs for zines

 

ZL – What made you choose to start promoting zines?

NZ – I started nicezines on tumblr in 2012 when I was in university. I did a degree in book arts and design (It was all about fine art bookbinding mixed with whatever design you were into, a sad side of this is that that degree course no longer exists) I love all printed matter and wanted to share all the amazing artists I was finding whilst doing my own research on projects.

Yoshitomo Nara Cover

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

NZ – Anything by Yoshitomo Nara and everything in ‘Nobody Knows: Yoshitomo Nara Drawing’

 

 

 

 

ZL – Given an unlimited budget and all the time in the world, what would be the project you’d make to be remembered by?  NiceZines insta feed

NZ – I’d love to turn nicezines into a publishing house, that would be super cool and so much fun.

 

ZL – Why an instagram account and not a review zine?

NZ – I’ve never thought about making one of those before! I love using Instagram though because it’s free and you can easily reach so many people around the world.

 

 

ZL – What one publication would you choose if you had to choose something for all the world to read?

NZ – Private Eye I’m a huge fan of satire mixed with current affairs.

 

 

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

Review – Pocket Thoughts Annual #1

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Pocket Thoughts Annual #1

I love this little 16 pager in both thought and fact.

 

The Thought

It’s a gathering of a whole murders row of zinesters who gang about with each other online, by which I mean, there’s the core of a whole online scene here.  The thought that appeals so much here is the feeling that someone’s gathering up the troupe to put on a classic repartee performance for the audience. It’s the zine equivalent of a British ensemble cast. They all have their character they do so well that you never tire of seeing them do it. They’re all so good at what they do, they bring something new to it. They all like each other so much, that they just play together well and it’s damn fun to watch it all happen.

I love the thought that someone has finally put together this little scene as a physical object, it feels like the moment a notional thought has coalesced, a dream made reality is probably a step to far, maybe more a zine scene fest for your pocket?

The fact it’s a 16 pager of curated guests is as fitting as it gets really. Proper zine scene diy glory at its photocopied, immediate best. I should clarify why I say curated. Even if this wasn’t a by invitation production (by which I mean – I  have no knowledge of whether this was by invitation, or just ended up this way) you can still see who is in touch with who in this scene here. It’s really, as I say, a murders row of all the biggies in their scene. This isn’t some exclusionary thing though, just a gang of online friends putting a best foot forward for the fun of it to let people know what they’re at and invite them all in on it.

 

The Fact

It is a great little zine with everybody putting in a great turn. I literally liked everything in there. All killer, no filler is fair here – depending on your tastes of course. To expand a bit on that – this is just a great collection of zine creations. Its very typically zine; rough, Contents Listall about the personal. It get’s in there and talks quick and cheap or it speaks it’s own poetic idiom and asks you to meet it with your arms open. By that measure, everything is great because I feel that I get to know each contributor from their single page, there’s not one where I come away wandering what that person is about. As the zine is labelled ‘a showcase of zinesters from around the world’ you can’t ask for more.

For my own personal tastes, there are some that I connected with more than the others, but that’s more about me and my tastes and nature than it is about the quality of one over the other. I’m not going to go over them all, but 2 examples that stand out are Richard Larios’s (feral publications) piece, which is just so quick and blunt and to the point it made me absolutely smile. Literally the zine equivalent of a hardcore punk 30 second blast of rage. I don’t know if anyone knows who Steve Ditko is or what his later career after SpiderMan and Doctor Strange was like, but this had that same blunt, political smash of his later work (though a different political take). Latibule’s piece just struck a chord with its cleverly poetic image. What struck me was the way they both use the same language, but one is spitting and the other is singing (both in the best way).

To stop myself disappearing into a detailed little synopsis of every piece, what I want to say is that I like how the pieces have been ordered as much as I like the pieces. I like that there’s such a range of style and approach, but I also think that the individual pieces have been placed in an order that flatters each piece as part of the whole.

I’ve used the analogy of an album of music being about the whole rather than the strength of individual tracks and I think that this is the case here. What is all the more amazing is that this is the equivalent of a scene compilation but feels like an album and not a collection.

Really glad I got this and if you’re interested in zine scenes, this is a great little taster of this group.

 

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

The Short List – Tim Bird

NEW COMIC – Asleep In The Back

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GA4-2-2-copy
Grey Area – publishe by Avery Hill

ZL – Why and when did you start making comics and how many comics have you made?

TB – As a kid I was always drawing – little cartoons of my friends and family, doodles, comic strips. My friend came up with a character called Pseudoboy and I drew some comics about him, but it never occurred to me to publish them or show them to people outside my friendship group. It wasn’t until I visited Thought Bubble in 2010 that I realised there was such a large community of comic book creators self-publishing their work and I wanted to get involved! I started doing diary comics that I shared online and began a series called Grey Area, which was published by Avery Hill Publishing. There were four issues of Grey Area, and I self-published a few short comics before I made my first graphic novel, The Great North Wood, which was also published by Avery Hill Publishing last year.

I’ve also made lots of other short comics for various anthologies like Dirty Rotten Comics, Over The Line and Off Life.

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

TB – I vividly remember my dad reading Tintin comics to me when I was very young, explaining how speech bubbles and thought bubbles worked, and how you followed the story by moving from one panel to the next. One image in particular stayed with me – a

TinTin
Tintin – Rascar Capac

character called Rascar Capac breaking through a window to throw a crystal ball full of poison at Tintin. It was terrifying to me when I was young, but I would dare myself to look at it and try and draw it.

 

 

 

 

 

ZL – I currently own only one of your comics, but really treasure it, ‘Rock & Pop‘. What impressed me was the way you took many short anecdotes and wound them into such an emotive narrative. How did you work how what would be in the story and how to pull it together?

Rock & Pop
Rock & Pop – Great little comic

TB – Rock & Pop started as a webcomic. The idea was to draw and post online one comic a week about a song that had inspired me or that I felt related to an important moment in my life. I started with songs that had felt important to me as a child (like Belinda Carlisle!) and continued through being a teenager, moving to London, meeting my wife, and having kids. The narrative all comes from my life, being interested in music. Just growing up really. People really responded to the webcomic, so collecting them for a print edition seemed like the right thing to do. Since self-publishing it, I’ve asked other people to send me comics based on their own responses to songs important to them, and have been posting them online – various-artists.co.uk (I’m always looking for new contributors for this!)

 

Various Artists
Various Artists – Tim’s music anthology website – Always seeking contributors

 

ZL – You’ve recently had your first graphic novel published, ‘The Great North Wood‘. I know you’ve published smaller works prior to that. What was the main difference between the two experiences?

TB – I tried to be more disciplined when I was writing the Great North Wood, making sure I had all the pages fully planned before I started drawing. With my shorter comics I often start drawing without really knowing where the story will end up, but with this longer project I thought I’d run into problems if I tried to do that. I spent a lot of time doing research for the book – studying the history of the area that the book’s about, and reading about folklore associated with forests and woodlands.   15    I think the fact that it’s a longer a piece of work, and took longer to create, means I invested more into it emotionally, and feel really attached to it. A lot of my comics are about a feeling of connection with a specific place, and spending so long writing about south-east London for this book has increased my bond with the area. I’ve recently finished a short comic called Asleep In The Back, and it’s been nice to feel a bit less involved with a piece of work – to put it down and move on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ZL – Which one creator you love seeing do you feel the world knows too little about, and what would you like to tell us about them?

TB – I don’t know about in comics – there’s so much good work being made right now that I don’t think I can pick just one creator to tell you about! In music though, I’m always surprised Debsey Wykes isn’t more well known. She sang backing vocals for Saint Etienne and has fronted two bands – Dolly Mixture and Birdie. They’re both great!

 

 

 

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

The Short List – wing three comics

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ZL – I’ve only seen your work on your instagram account, but I see that you produced or were producing a black and white zine, was this made and, considering how much of your account is in colour, why go with black and white?

WTC – The black and white zine is called “Clara” and is incomplete. I printed out a few copies of Part One to submit to the Laydeez do Comics award on my home printer. I was not successful in my award application and received feedback that it wasn’t clear – which

Clara
Clara – Graphic novel in progress

I agree with. This was the first time I ever submitted anything! I will keep working on it. At the moment, I’m planning for it to be a three-part series. Clara is hand-drawn in pencil. The pencil drawings started as rough sketches but then I received positive feedback on the pencil, so I kept it. I scanned the pencil drawings and used the multiplication tool in Photoshop to get the black and white look. The black and white aesthetic is a better match for the story about grief than the bright colours I often use in my sketches.

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

WTC – I remember discovering Frida Kahlo when I was a teenager. It was that time of life when I was exploring what it meant to be an individual and a woman for the first time. I was also suffering from chronic pain, so I connected with her physical and metaphysical suffering. I grew up in the countryside in the US and didn’t have many opportunities to see fine art. I first saw her paintings in books, so it wasn’t a single piece of work – it was her lifetime of self-portraits. I think her use of colour has stuck with me ever since.

Comics is an artform I discovered later in life. The first comics I totally loved was the Love and Rockets series by Gilbert and Jamie Hernandez. It completely blew my mind. They created a rich world of complex characters and great storylines that inspired me to want to do the same. It’s a crazy hard thing to do!

Underground Art - Blue Orange Guy
Underground Art – Blue Orange Guy

ZL – Someone contacts you and say they want you offer you a year long residency. Where would be your ideal location and what would you produce?

WTC – My ideal location would be the Japanese countryside. I would travel there with no expectations of what I would produce and see what happens.

 

ZL – I’m particularly in love with the texture of your Instagram images and wondered how what you use to create those images?

WTC – Thank you! My instagram account is mainly filled with London tube portraits. I use small brown paper sketchbooks from Paperchase that have this slightly grainy texture. They are the right size for clandestine drawing in public places! I use a mixture of posca pens and wax crayons. I look to draw people who are either asleep or

Underground Art - Pink Lips
Underground Art – Pink Lips

completely absorbed in a book or their phones, that’s why most have their eyes closed. I sketch with Posca pens and colour in my sketches with crayon at a later time. I rediscovered crayons on a train journey from London to Edinburgh while drawing with my kids. Kids are so good at mixed media!

 

ZL – Your colour choices are really exciting and individual, what is the most important influence on those choices and do you draw inspiration from a specific practitioner or style?

WTC – I love contrast – be it black and white minimalism or bright loud colours. I think my early influences helped develop my taste. Frida Kahlo, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Mark Rothko were my first loves in art. One artist who recently made a huge impact on my colour choices is Lisa Brice. I saw her exhibit at Tate Britain and completely fell in love with her use of blue.

 

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Previous Interview – The Short List – Mattias Gunnarrson

 

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

Review – Coffee & People 1 & 2

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five o'clock zines header

 

 

 

I don’t intend doing this often but Craig is someone who promotes zines and zinesters very effectively on his instagram account five o’clock zine – go follow that link and check out all of his reviews.

 

 

 

Review – Coffee & People 1 & 2

Two classic mini-zines this time round. A7 single pagers, typed and pasted up then photocopied and stuck down.

A lovely, immediate and simple format.

Coffee & People
Coffee & People – the perfectly formed mini-zone format

A format perfect for the two little stories told in these zines.

It’s very easy to say (and imagine) that such zines are just quickly thrown together, with little thought and can be quickly consumed and thrown away with little thought.  In truth the medium prevents great depths; the content likewise, is seemingly small and inconsequential in the grand scheme. All of this is true. All of this misses the whole point of the worth of these items.

These little zines are the hand of friendship reached out from another world, reaching a stranger in a strange land. They’re a conversation on a bus or bumping into the friend of friend you barely know. You may share the same proximity, but not the same world. They are in essence, one of the reasons I find great virtue in zines. They open ways of seeing I never knew existed and focus my eyes for a few minutes on existence as I’ve never seen it before.

Coffee & People
Coffee & People 1

Coffee & People works this well, keeping the language simple and clear, getting out of its own way and letting it be a conversation, rather than a didactic exercise or the florid flexing of some personal neuroses. What recommends these to me is getting to sit and experience a life never lived in a world I know nothing about, (something I’m always going to immediately like, it’s my current jam).

Coffee & People
Coffee & People 2

Of the two, issue 2 is my favourite with it being more focussed on what it’s telling us. It satisfies more, even though (or maybe because?) there’s less in it that I recognise from my own life.

 

I also like how inexplicit it is when coming full circle at the end.

In the end, these stories will not rock your world, they will not plumb the depths of the human soul. These stories will open your eyes to another human life and let you see what it’s like to be alive as that person, even if it’s only for a few minutes. If that’s your jam, then indulge with these homemade lovelies.

 

 

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Previous Review- Warglitter 1

 

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

The Short List – Mattias Gunnarrson

Disclosure – I should let you all know that I have worked with Mattias on a contributor copy only zine.

MASU sculpture project, Traces of Movement
MASU sculpture project Halmstad, Sweden Spring 2018 Traces of Movement

Mattias                instagram              MASU

 

ZL – You are an artist often working with groups or on large public pieces – what place do zines have in your work?

MG – Zines and self-published work have its own platform in my practice, and then it plays different roles in different projects. For example, there is one solo track where I draw by myself and collect the drawings on a blog (visual notes) where a constantly changing narrative occurs, one that I can look at for a better understanding of how I am working and what topics or methods interest me at the moment. These drawings are turned in to a type of random collage zines every three months or so like an archive of my drawing work. Another type of zine is the series ”MASU Works” that I do together with my colleague Susanne when we collaborate as MASU and do larger scale sculpture work both in urban public space and as Land Art in the forest.

MASU Works 5

We use MASU Works to collect sketches, try out new types of methods, document projects as well as invite writers or produce exhibition catalogues. MW has an open format, with no specific logo, size, design or purpose but is rather elastic in its framework for whatever is the content. MW is both an ongoing process for us,an artist collective and a way for us to distribute and share our work and we make issues when we have projects.

Besides this I am also part of a few different situations where self-publishing is involved where either zines are produced, traded or lectured about as well as collected, archived and discussed.

So, to conclude your question I think self-publishing is constantly present in my practice in different formats.

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time ?

MG – There are probably many of those moments that I have forgotten, but I think the one moment in recent years that took my breath away was the work of Tadashi Kawamata at Centre de Pompidou in Paris 2010. The actual exhibited pieces, a couple of loosely constructed huts or sheds that hung outside on the building facade, were of course great but what really got me was an image in a book from an older project: Apartment project “Tetra House N-3 W-26” 1983 Intervention in situ. In this project old wooden planks flow around the small house like the wind, almost encapsulating the building. The movement in the wood in relation to the solidness of the house is mindblowing.

Kawamata’s early projects really opened things up for me.

 

ZL – Given an unlimited budget and all the time in the world, what would be the project you’d make to be remembered by?

MG – Oh. It would be a project dealing with education.

I really like the Skateistan-project (www.skateistan.org) which started as a support structure for young girls in Afghanistan where they could go and learn how to skateboard, and once in the spot there was also education and an empowering environment. The project has branched out to more locations, also including boys.

Education for next generation global citizens is key.

So, if I had the means I would do projects like this in a bigger scale than I do now.

 

ZL – You work at a university that seems to have an amazing zine library, if you could suddenly find any one zine, what would be that treasure?

Organisation Is Not Neutral
Organisation Is Not Neutral Published January 2018

MG – 🙂 I am not sure about amazing yet, we are still very much setting it up, with just over 300 titles so far, but let’s hope we get there.

It is a difficult question, about the one great great treasure. I think for me it is mostly about the variety and the differences of the archive, that it holds  both writing and photo essays, screen printed zines and copy machined work, drawings, paintings, collages and poetry from professionals, students and kids. Of course it would be amazing with early works by Basquiat or Patty Smith, but still I believe that the zine world is not so much about stars and collectibles and rather about the possibility to get voices out and bypass the marketplace. So, I think the real gems in a zine collection are the ones where someone just could not resist telling the story, where it just had to be told.

 

ZL – Which one creator you love seeing do you feel the world knows too little about, and what would you like to tell us about them?

As I said before, Tadashi Kawamata is my always go-to artist. His way of working with materials, people and the space is extraordinary. Even though he is now realizing some real grand projects, I feel mostly connected to his smaller scale projects where there is such tactile connection between the different components. Also his drawings and models for the projects are incredible!

 

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Previous Interview – The Short List – mir.and.or

 

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

The Short List – mir.and.or

Disclosure – I should let you all know that I have worked with mir.and.or on a contributor copy only zine and am currently working with mir.and.or on a project currently slated to publish in June.

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ZL – Why and when did you start making comics?

M – I have always wanted to make comics from a young age, originally just because of the aesthetic of traditional comics, the colours and line-art which I always loved. I also always found comics a very impressive art form as well, one that took a lot of time, effort and skill but wasn’t as self-indulgent as other illustrative professions. However I never actually made any sequential pieces until my third year of uni, before then I think I was a little scared that I might ruin the thing I admired the most, if I wasn’t good enough.

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

M – In terms of comics I guess the one that stands out the most for me was Victor Moscoso’s super psychy comics from Zap. When I was 15 or so I used to be obsessed with psychedelic rock posters and I think someone at some point told me he did comics as Victor Moscosowell and I was just mind blown because I didn’t know comics like that even existed. But it definitely just felt a lot more natural to me than the narrative based comics I had been reading.

 

ZL – Given an unlimited budget and all the time in the world, what would be the project you’d make to be remembered by?

M – I think I’d really like to do a collaborative audio-visual comic with a band or musician which visualises a full album. I’d love to just do something really experimental with sound and perhaps even try out some kind of live events/exhibitions.

Hurricane page 1

ZL – You’ve featured in a number of anthologies that I know of, including Heavy Metal, do you have plans for any long form work??

M – There are quite a few stories I want to tell from my childhood which could translate into a series, but I think at this point I am still looking for the right way to visualise them. I don’t think I could really be happy with illustrating them in any traditional or representational way. I am working on finding an angle that allows me to show a really emotional side of being stuck in your own head as a kid and is less bothered by the events or characters in the stories.

Briz de Mar Page 7

 

ZL – What is the most important influence on your current work?

M – I’m usually influenced by a lot of different types of things, not necessarily comics or art. At the moment I really just like looking at textures, in particular within fashion. Just finding interesting fabrics and surfaces and looking at how they move. Then kind of thinking about what kind of feeling or emotion that texture has and from that I find a story. Which I guess is what designing for fashion is all about, although I don’t know too much about it.

 

 

Previous interview – The Short List – Shuffleplay comics

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

Warglitter Review

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Warglitter Issue 1

 

I believe in coincidence.

I know as fact that things just happen BECAUSE. Because being my personal truth, (personal truth – the little white lies that cover the cracks). BECAUSE meaning the millions of things that are always happening that you know nothing about, refuse to acknowledge, don’t want to talk about, aren’t interested in as they’re just not important enough to waste life time on, etc.

BECAUSE being like this – Did you know microwaves were first created in the late 40’s? Not really popular until the 80’s BECAUSE. You could list cost, acceptability, blah, blah, blah. It’s just easier to accept that it was BECAUSE and get on with life. Is that the same attitude you want to take towards your future, your relationships?

Because is a default for the shoulder shrug, the pulled face, the ‘a butterfly’s wing flapping…’, the defeatist ‘oh who can be bothered’. I say or think BECAUSE as it’s so hard to face the thing I’m becausing about. The question is, is that how to live a good life (by which I mean attain contentment), (Happiness and the search for it, is a GRAIL quest, the modern search for eternal life).

Getting back to track. BECAUSE, then, is the enemy of a reviewer really. It is too often treated as a friend though. I guess that comes down to space and TL:DR. Too often a reviewer states that you’ll like a thing, rather than discussing what it does and why that should matter. It’s the gatekeeper mentality – I’m cool and I’ll tell you what’s cool, not argue why it’s worth your time.

It’s what I’ve been fighting with when thinking of a review for Warglitter. My urge is to say – get it BECAUSE it’s AWESOME, (another catchall for – too big to tell you).

I mean; it’s true, but it’s not honest. Yes, the two can be exclusive. Honesty requires the commitment to fullness, truth requires you don’t lie. I am not believer in truth, personal or universal, in case it wasn’t clear from the above. I’m going to be honest and say, I believe any search for TRUTH is the opportunity to avoid personal honesty and responsibility.

Warglitter Zines

 

Now, you’ll be thinking, why are you telling me all this? (I like the sound of my own thoughts?) Well, because Warglitter – the person, not the zine – has crafted an amazing work where she’s starting to be honest with herself and maybe leaving the search for Truth behind. She may not even know it…

My evidence? Well, Warglitter lays out her purpose up front. She writes about why she writes a journal and tells us what commitments she made. She gives me all my clues right up front and right out clear.

These things are telling, to me at least.

  1. write down beliefs and personal truths – having beliefs and personal truths next to each other sounds like someone being honest and then hiding a truth they don’t want to witness, saying ‘they’re not beliefs, they’re personal truths…’

A new addition to the list

  1. dismantle your defence mechanism persona –having to go back and qualify and talk about personal psychology, about defences, seems a change in understanding. Time has given a gift of new understanding. Like 5 is the knee jerk reaction and then 8 is the slow dawning realisation of the Honest facts.

If that is the case, then these

  1. keep up a regular tarot practice and dig deep
  2. creating my next niche
  3. work through depression and learn from it

are the pendulum swinging between how to be Honest and how to hide from it.

  1. decorate this journal – make it a sacred object –says it all, fetishise that Truth. Then again, those later additions take it back down to earth – back to magic, down to earth. Pendulum swinging, swinging.

Being honest – why is this amazing?

There are so many echoes of what matters to me right now, what I’ve struggled with.

For me, this is a timely piece of work to appear before me.

It’s not what I’d do to deal with these subjects.

Likewise, Warglitter does things and holds belief that I have no personal commitment or interest in. Yet, here she is talking about things I’ve spent years struggling with, talking about things I’ve finally been able to think honestly about. Saying them in ways and contexts very different to mine and so making them clearer for me to see.

If you asked to label it, it’s a perzine verfremdung effect – I love Brecht’s idea that to make something more obvious, you should first make it appear strange.

It’s what I’m always hoping to achieve, but here made simple where I would hide it in layers of pomp.

That’s what I like about this, it’s like looking at my life but as I’ve never lived or experienced it, so I don’t have to hide from the truth it reveals.

What I take from this may not be what is meant by this and may not be what you get from this, but it is why I think this is an amazing piece of work.

I see that there is no solution to who you are, or what you’re feeling – there’s only being honest with yourself and dealing with those facts rather than just excusing yourself with BECAUSE, (because no one ever loved me, I’ll be unlovable… because I keep getting hurt, I’ll push everyone away – they’re all TRUE and you’ll never solve that TRUTH, you just have to be honest, face it and deal with it every day, but by facing it and putting it out there each day it might just get easier to be that better person, get that step closer to contentment and kindness.

This is a brave work and a hard path and deserves your attention because of the reward you may get from it.

The Short List – Warglitter Zines Interview

Previous Review: Intercorstal: Extension Review

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

The Short List – Shuffleplay comics

Disclosure – I should let you all know that I have worked with Shuffleplay Comics on a number of contributor copy only zines and am currently working with Shuffleplay on a project currently slated to publish in June.

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ZL – Your work often uses songs as inspiration, what is it about interpretting these works that appeals to you?

SPC – I would visualise stories and ideas behind song lyrics when I listen to music. It’s been a natural habit since my teens, but back then, I didn’t have the technical skills to implement my ideas. Now that I’m somewhat technically trained to make music videos, I just go at it every time I feel compelled to.

New Order - Regret

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

SPC – Oh wow, I can’t even remember. One of my all-time favourite illustrators is Tomer Hanuka and this picture has always stood out to me.

Tomer Hanuka
Tomer Hanuka

ZL – Given an unlimited budget and all the time in the world, what would be the project you’d make to be remembered by?

JR_08

 

SPC – I don’t have very long-termed projects nor do I want to be remembered. If 

I have unlimited time and budget though, I’ll probably hire people to build a huge sci-fi theme park. I’ll hire actors to play the roles of citizens in this made-up world. Everyone will have to wear space suits/dumb futuristic costumes just for the lulz. Only myself, my family and friends will have access to this place, muahahaha.

 

ZL – You’ve created a lot of high quality zines by now, which of these makes you most proud and why?

SFP – Hmm, probably Ghosting. The content’s kind of cringy now that I look back at it, but I’m amazed that I managed to stick to it for three months.

 

 

ZL – Which one creator you love seeing do you feel the world knows too little about, and what would you like to tell us about them?

SFPAdrian Tomine. He is already really well-known, but I’d always recommend his work, “Killing and Dying“.

 

 

 

previous post – The Short List – Livor Mortis Zine

all art copyright and trademark it's respective owners. content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

The Short List – Livor Mortis Zine

Disclosure – I should let you all know that I am currently at work on a collaborative zine with Livor Mortis Zine, release date TBC, and that I once won a competition for issue 3 of LMZ (a set of three beautiful zines).

IMG_7746

Livor Mortis Zine                                                                       stphnrttly

ZL – Why paper and not blogs?

LMZ – Being born in the mid-1980’s, I feel that I owe a lot to analogue in all formats; from VHS to vinyl, practical effects over CGI etc. Even though I use computers daily and understand the great advantages of digital outlets, however, I feel that a physical item is a lot nicer and more human. I specifically started LMZ based on glue, paper, scalpel etc and felt I should keep digital creation to a minimum. We can rely on paper a lot more as digital/technology is a lot more harmful towards us both physically and mentally.

With physical copies of a zine, you can distribute and interact outside, away from a computer. I am sure that most of the population like to touch what they can see, and I feel that adds greatly to the experience. Having physical copies on paper has led to opportunities I would have missed out on if I were to be blog based, like selling zines on a face-to-face basis.

This started with great assistance from Books Peckham (site & instagram) and DIY Space For London (DSFL site & instagram).

Their next zine fair is 17 thMarch 2019 @ 96-108 Ormside St, SE15 1TF.

Anyone that is interested in zines and DIY self-publishing should definitely visit.

One of my favourite zines of recent times was picked up (traded) at a previous zine fair at DSFL. It’s by Olga Writes Things and is titled ‘Body Hair: A Love/Hate Story’. Reading this really made me question how brainwashed our culture is by media. I would suggest reading this zine especially if you are open minded and not a sexist. I also appreciate how personal it is too, I doubt many people would be so direct and honest

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

LMZ – The first time I can remember really loving an artistic creation was probably as a 4/5 year old, whilst watching both ‘Ghostbusters’ the film and animated series. However, years later, the 2001 album ‘Mediocre Generica‘ by Leftover Crack really shaped me as a person and actually impacted my life for the better! It opened my eyes and ears to many different genres and styles of music. Before listening to that album, I was strictly into punk music and was quite ignorant and stubborn to entertain anything else.0045778043361.png.925x925_q90The album contains elements of ska, reggae, black metal, death metal and of course punk. It was definitely a great tool for mind expansion and propelled me violently into a world of mixing genres and breaking rules. Plus the lyrical content was perfect for my mentality as a teen; no pop-punk focused girl/boy relation dramas, just real talk and political anger. Without hearing this album, I do wonder if I would have ever spent 10 years running independent death metal record labels and if I would have stayed on a straight path and mixed with healthy society focused individuals. I do not really know many other bands that mix many alternative styles so well! Apart from the pre-fix of ‘Leftover Crack’, which is the band ‘Choking Victim’.
I can still listen to the album today and get wild enjoyment from it. ‘Mediocre Generica’ is not my favourite album, but it is totally an important release in terms of who I am today. I am sure LMZ carries some connection to the crack rock steady beat, away from the ‘INDK’ lyrics inside the front cover of issue 4.

 

ZL – Given an unlimited budget and all the time in the world, what would be the project you’d make to be remembered by?

LMZ – I literally had this conversation just the other day with a film maker friend of mine, we even started a script to be prepared for the day an unlimited budget comes our way! I won’t give away too much in terms of the overall direction, but the aim would be to focus on making a story to make people more aware and involved in stopping child abuse. I am sure I am not the only person who questions why the rich and powerful are always connected to extreme child abuse?! I know it is a nasty and emotionally destroying subject to even comprehend, but it is a vast problem all over the world.  If I could be involved in anything that would expose and shutdown child abusers and sex traffickers in general, I would be very happy. The budget would go on practical special FX (ideally Tom Savini ❤️) and getting really strong and respected actors/actresses involved so people would take notice.

Away from that, I would really like to be involved and remembered for something that would get Tony Blair and George Bush Jr executed for war crimes.
As the budget is unlimited, any leftover would be used to buy and delete Facebook.

 

 

ZL – Your images come from all around the world, where is your favourite place in the world you’ve never visited?

LMZ – Asia, especially the Far East! I would really like to go there and I am sure that I would never leave. In my head, it seems so alien compared to the world I live in, I’m sure it would feel like home. The level of excitement and fear is through the roof!
My passionate feelings towards the continent originated from Eastern cinema and anime. I remember watching films like ‘Urotsukidoji’ and ‘Hausu’ at a young age and being so impressed after getting tired of the typical Hollywood/Western film formula. The imagination and creativity out in the East is so rich, there is even a Japanese horror sub-genre which focuses on cat horror alone.
Another part of Asia I would like to experience is Bali, Indonesia. There is an annual festival that takes places there called ‘Nyepi’ aka ‘Day of Silence’.

nyepi

I do not think Google search results justify this festival, so take a look at the Instagram account @ogohogoh_bali

 

ZL – What single creation [book, zine, film, group, place, whatever!!] would you settle down with and just chill?

LMZ – I really chill with audio commentaries attached to cult Italian films such as Lucio Fulci’s ‘Gates Of Hell’ trilogy or any of Dario Argento’s early works for example. Last night I bulk listened to three commentaries on the early US slasher ‘The Burning’.

7e914caa5b54d29e1ae345243fc074a72f67c7b1r1-1024-800v2_hq

I find it really fascinating to hear all the behind-the-scenes details relating to the production of the final product. It is nice to be able to just listen to something, rather than watch. I guess I should check out some more podcasts!