Review – The Blame by Jon Aye

A collection of short stories from Jon Aye.

Jon Is currently taking part in the digital Hackney Comic & Zine Fair.

Find him on twitter

I enjoyed this. A quick read that I think I could go back and spend some more time dealing with the bigger ideas it touches upon.

I often see these kinds of comic zines or this style labelled as experimental, but I’m not sure the label fits as well as alternative would. I feel there’s too much in the history of comics, I was immediately reminded of the cartooning on Dick Tracy as soon as I looked at this. The story approach is similarly easy to follow and parse, with its brevity seeming at points both dreamlike and histrionic, by which I mean there are strips where each line is designed to be dialogue delivering drama rather than naturalistic speech so it all seems like high drama pounding out the beats.

There are a couple of nice one pagers that amused me, such as the one below.

But there were a couple of strips that I found much more interesting, that got me actually thinking. They both deal with current society in its post-Thatcherite state, one obliquely and one more directly. Specifically ‘Disaster!’ and ‘Problem Solving’.

They’re both still short snippets, respectively four pages and one page, but together there is a personal thesis about post-Thatcherite UK society that I think bears expanding upon. It’s not so much that the thoughts are necessarily in depth in those stories but the combination of the two coming at the subject manages to make it so that we get a more rounded understanding of that thesis. It’s an interesting way to experience opinions without having to commit to reading a long heavy storyline exploring the subject.

I particularly like the approach to sci-fi in ‘Disaster’, it’s a very New Wave of Science Fiction attempt to look at matters, with a good use of ‘disaster’ as metaphor. I’d personally like to see that idea expanded as I think that world has some legs, but it doesn’t need expanding for the story to work as it is.

UKPLC also touches on current affairs in a nicely timed and confidently cartooned way. I like the visual approach and the somewhat abrupt approach to timing in the strips. Not all of the ideas work for me, either they’re a bit too pat  or didn’t have that much of a new idea (‘Writing’ and ‘New Name’), but the work itself is strong and individual whilst still feeling part of a contemporary comic scene.

Internet find – How to find your way

This is a cool zine to download and print out yourself – I love it when people do this.

It’s from Gregoire Huret

find him here – twitter instagram facebook

This is a cool looking zine as well. I like street photography and I think Paris may be my favourite city. These are good portraits and a great idea to mark their positions on a map included in the zine.

go here for the downloads

No photo description available.

the short list – Miguel Correia – Portuguese zinester

Miguel Correia

editor and publisher of Fanzine UltraViolenta

Find Miguel here

website           instagram         facebook

UltraViolenta is  35€ per 5 issues bundle on sale here 

How long have you been publishing zines?

Fanzine Ultra Violenta is an artistic fanzine founded and edited in Portugal by art director Miguel Correia since the beginning of the astonishing year of 2020.

This visual and conceptual exploration project brings together several artists, most of them from Portugal, but also from around the globe.

To this moment the collective consists of 28 artists and we believe that by the time the 12th edition is issued they will amount to 50.

So far there are five issues available and numbers 6 and 7 are already in the editorial stage. 

What do they include?

Each edition has a unique theme and compiles the works of up to five artists from different artistic areas. Each artist will freely interpret the chosen theme. On each edition the artist is given a textured and coloured sheet as a means to entice the creative process as well as to create an editorial guideline. There are no additional briefings or any other conditioning to the artists’ process apart from the given sheet.

The final results have been rather expressive and varied with compositions ranging from the punk and grunge culture to the urban graffiti culture, and even extending to the Dadaist movement’s manifestos. 

Themes for each issue have been 

Issue n1 -Fevereiro 2020-Theme: Eat

Issue n2 -Março 2020-Theme: Dream

Issue n3 -Abril 2020-Theme: Pandemic

Issue n4 -Maio 2020-Theme: Mutant

Issue nº5 -Junho 2020-Theme: Poison

Designers include Miguel Correia, Joana de Matos, João Tiago Fernandes, Nélia Costa, Vasco Cardoso, Inês de Carvalho, Pedro Marques ( Piteko), Vera Barbosa, Nevio Buzov, Isabel Nunes, João Cláudio Larraz, Ana Calisto, Marcelo Ribeiro, Luisa Maria Benito, Joseph Simão, Lara Teang, Luis Miguel Delgado, Arianna Picoli, Álvaro (Alph) Ferreira, Kali Kali, Ogata Tetsuo, Raquel Barrocas, Nuno Freire, Anna Klos, Elias Marques, Lydia Swinney, Sérgio Correia and Jorge Tavares.

What inspiration made you start?

This project takes us back to a pre digital time, a time where information was scarce and transmitting it was best conveyed through these fanzines, thus, making them the preferred method of divulgation of a given ideology by artists, music bands, photographers, writers and illustrators. Fanzines are mostly self-published and they are created using simple production methods in which artists make use of a myriad of different techniques. From photography, drawings, collages and cutouts to the use of risographs and even taking advantage of the iconic Xerox printers’ very unique expressiveness. All these were used to create a new form of transmitting art, a form that people could share between them and through which they could assert and discuss opinions on a given matter.

What inspiration keeps you going?

Fanzine Ultra Violenta’s goal is to encourage this form of artistic expression and to enfold the participating artists in a creative process of sharing and experimenting.

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.

content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

the short list – Eduardo Cardoso – Portuguese zinester

Eduardo Cardoso

Publisher of Perseus and Atmosfera explosiva

Find Eduardo here

website facebook instagram   octodon   IUOMA

Thanx to Miguel Correira for organising and translating this interview a version of this interview in the original Portuguese can be found here

How long have you publishing zines?

I’ve been publishing zines for around 10 years.

 

What do they include?

They include collage, poetry, found poetry, etc.

 

What inspiration made you start?

Artist books. DIY and Mail Art publications.

What inspiration keeps you going?

The love for books and small publications. Mail Art.

 

Links:

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.

content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

the short list – Rodolfo Mariano – Portuguese zinester

Find Rodolfo Mariano here

website         instagram

Thanx to Miguel Correira for organising and translating this interview a version of this interview in the original Portuguese can be found here

How long have you been publishing?

My first comic book/zine was self-published in 2012 while I was in art school, 12 pages of cheap drawing A4 paper, xerox printed.

My latest comic zine was printed and published last July, 36 pages, colour covers, professionally printed.

What does it include?

For a long while I’ve had my work featured in some zines made by other artists, small illustrations, covers, drawings and sketches… However my main activity, the heart and soul of my artistic work, was making comics using traditional media (pen, pencil, brush and india ink). 

What inspiration made you start?

At the time I was yearning for being able to design, print and publish my own comic books, my own titles and projects. Simultaneously I had another goal too, I really wanted to reach an audience because comics themselves tend to beg for having readers to whom books/zines/objects are small treasures. In Portugal there’s a tiny indie small press scene, which I’m still learning the ins and outs of, it was a very pleasant surprise back when I’ve started printing and selling my own books/zines getting to know such an awesome community. Since then I’ve been making friends and slowly growing my audience along the way.

What inspiration keeps you going?

I love the freedom to plan, create and publish my own comic books and be able to reach multiple audiences while growing as an artist and be part of a creative, open-minded, diverse community. Overall print as a medium with all it’s character and apparent limitless possibilities suits me and my creative process very well. There’s a long road ahead full of wonders, there’s no reason not to keep going.

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.

content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

the short list – Matilde Horta – Portuguese zinester

You can find Matilde here

online store          portfólio          instagram

Thanx to Miguel Correira for organising and translating this interview a version of this interview in the original Portuguese can be found here

Queens of Portugal

is the first fanzine I did with my 15 year old sister. We decided to make a project based on the things we’re both good at: Illustration and History. The idea of this project is to explore and show in small condensed booklets some topics from the History of Portugal that people know less about (or just things we love and want to share). Also to teach kids in a very short and illustrated way. The first edition was a success and we even did a second edition that is currently sold out. 

Who published it?

Me and my sister Maria did it all and published it ourselves

How long have you published it for?

We first published it in February 2020.

What does it include?

The book is a compilation of both illustration and text about history.

What inspiration made you start?

I wanted to draw queens’ portraits and my sister loves history so we combined both!

What inspiration keeps you going?

Our inspiration is mainly fun and knowledge. Still, we love the feeling of teaching our readers in an easy going way. Keep on researching about history and keep illustrating cultural artefacts and things we know that are important for our country, culture and for what we are.

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.

content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

the short list – João Oliveira and Guilherme Ferrugento – Portuguese zinesters

Find João here

website               instagram

Thanx to Miguel Correira for organising and translating this interview a version of this interview in the original Portuguese can be found here

João Oliveira and Guilherme Ferrugento, authors of

Spooky Action At a Distance I

How long have you been publishing it?

The first edition of the zine was published in January 2020. It will be an annual publication with the next one to be published in the end of 2020 beginning of 2021.

What does it include?

Einstein’s ‘spooky action at a distance’ theory referred to ‘quantum entanglement’, which states that the measurement of one particle will instantly influence another particle, regardless of how far apart they are.

The idea of the publication was for each one of the artists to produce an image on alternate days as a way to inspire each other to draw more. Each image could take no more than 20 minutes.

The images would then travel back and forth between Brussels and Coimbra through the magic of instant messaging.

The drawings were then selected amongst nearly a hundred made between November 2018 and June 2019.

What inspiration made you start?

We used to push each other to draw during Uni and when we went our own ways this was how we managed to keep inspiring each other despite the physical distance.

What inspiration keeps you going?

The ability to stay connected through our art and to take a peak at each other’s way of seeing and representing the world. 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.

content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

the short list – Portuguese zinesters

On our zinelove chat facebook group Miguel Correia has been regularly posting links to his zine UltraViolenta. On the back of what he was doing I tracked down a group for Portuguese zinesters and asked to join. Miguel politely said it was there to help build a scene with Portugal and, being the nosy sod I am, I got to chatting with him about what it was like there at which point he kindly offered to float out a set of questions to his group and see what came back.

I asked a rough set of questions –

Who publishes their work?

How long have they published it for?

What do they include?

What inspiration made them start?

What inspiration keeps them going?

It turned out to be pure gold. We’ve got five great zinester interviews lined up for the week, all of which feature work that I would dearly love to own myself.

Hope you enjoy them all, AND if you are a Portuguese speaker you can visit these interviews over on Miguel’s site in it’s native tongue.

I’d like to give a thank you to everyone that has contributed to this and an even bigger thanx to Miguel for organising and translating these interviews. I hope you enjoy this work as much as I did and that you go an seek these peeps and their work out.

iestyn

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.

content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Small (press) oaks – Law Tissot

Cidade Cyber

There’s something beautifully Victorian Gothic about the penmanship of Law Tissot. His designs are perfectly simple and easy to read, just great cartoon designs, but the page is filled with marks and texture and grandly surreal landscapes. I can see the influence of Druillet and Giger in his work, but I’m much more deeply reminded of Jim Cawthorn’s approach to texture and line and the scratchy art of Bryan Talbot in Luther Arkwright or Nemesis and Matt Howarth’s whole approach, but the design just has a greater sense of PUNK about it.

Find Law here

instagram facebook

Can you tell us a bit about the first creator whose work you recognised?

I started reading comics very early. But I’m sure Jack Kirby made the first revolution in my life. The characters, spaceships, aliens, armor, weapons … all dynamic scenes. This is always very beautiful and exciting.

Jack Kirby inked by MIke Royer

(Comecei a ler histórias em quadrinhos muito cedo. Mas tenho certeza de que Jack Kirby fez a primeira revolução em minha vida. Os personagens, espaçonaves, aliens, armaduras, armas … todas as cenas dinâmicas. Isso é sempre muito bonito e emocionante.)

Which creators do you remember first copying?

Definitely Jack Kirby since always. But I need to talk a lot about the guys from Métal Hurlant magazine: Richard Corben, Enki Bilal, Moebius  and Philippe Druillet. Much more Druillet, I believe.

(Definitivamente Jack Kirby desde sempre. Mas preciso falar muito sobre os caras da revista Métal Hurlant: Richard Corben, Enki Bilal, Moebius e Philippe Druillet. Muito mais Druillet, creio.)

Who was the creator that you first thought ‘I’m going to be as good as you!’?

I really like underground comics, the freedom of fanzines and independent publishing. I have always tried to be an important author in the alternative scene. That interests me today.

(Eu realmente gosto de quadrinhos underground, a liberdade dos fanzines e da publicação independente. Sempre tentei ser um autor importante na cena alternativa. Isso me interessa ainda hoje.)

Which creator or creators do you currently find most inspiring?

As I said, Jack Kirby and Philippe Druillet have a lot of influence on my imagination. But today there is a lot of H.R.Giger in my art.

H.R.Giger

(Como eu disse, Jack Kirby e Philippe Druillet tem muito influência na minha imaginação. Mas hoje há muito do H.R.Giger na minha arte.)

Which creators do you most often think about?

I like to discover new fanzines. Distant artists with new ideas and new comics. These things happen all the time, talents that vibrate hidden. Treasures ready to be discovered. I want to see this happen.

(Gosto de descobrir novos fanzines. Artistas distantes com novas ideias e novos quadrinhos. Estas coisas acontecem o tempo todo, talentos que vibram escondidos. Tesouros prontos para serem descobertos. Eu quero ver isso acontecer.)

Can you name the first three creative peers that come into your head and tell a little bit about why?

Fábio Vermelho. For being a new friend I made recently. There is always so much to see in your art. All an urban atmosphere and psychobilly that attracts me. (Instagram @fabiovermelho)

Fabio Vermelho

Guilherme Santos (Moleton Fantasma) has a genius narrative ability. He takes his characters to places I would like to go.(Instagram @moletonfantasma)

Guilherme Santos

Henry Jaepelt has been an old friend since the 1980s. He still does many things that interest me. And its graphic universe is very powerful. It is impossible to remain indifferent. (Instagram @henryjaepelt)

Henry Jaepelt

(Fábio Vermelho. Por ser um novo amigo que fiz há pouco tempo. Há sempre tanto o que ver em sua arte. Toda uma atmosfera urbana e psychobilly que me atrai. 

Guilherme Santos (Moleton Fantasma) tem uma capacidade narrativa genial. Ele leva seus personagens por lugares que eu gostaria de ir.

Henry Jaepelt é um velho amigo desde os anos 1980. Ele ainda faz muitas coisas que me interessam. E seu universo gráfico é muito poderoso. Impossível ficar indiferente.)

Finally, can you tell us a bit about your recent work and yourself?

Cidade Cyber

I live in the extreme south of Brazil. I’ve been doing my comics and zines for over three decades, basically within cyberpunk sci-fi. I draw my comics every day and leave them where I can.

(Eu vivo no extremo sul do Brasil. Tenho feito meus quadrinhos e zines por mais de três décadas, basicamente dentro da ficção científica cyberpunk. Eu desenho meus quadrinhos todos os dias e os deixo onde posso.)

Thank you very much for taking the time to fill this out and let us into your mind.

Cidade Cyber – A Limusine Surrealista de Miss K

all art copyright and trademark its respective owners.

content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Small (press) oaks – Alberto Monteiro

Today is Brazilian Independence Day and I thought we’d celebrate that this week by talking to a number of Brazilian creators about their influences and inspirations. Now, I have very little knowledge of the Brazilian zine and small press zine, but I’ve certainly picked up a lot of interesting creators to follow over the last few weeks.

Alberto Monteiro has an incredible style, beautiful and stylish, an amazing sense of colour and great design sense, everything has a chunky sense of physicality to it that really caught my eye.

Find Alberto here

Instagram           flikr

Can you tell us a bit about the first creator whose work you recognised?

I have always been interested in visual works, colors, shapes, and since I am already 55, in my childhood everything was printed, everything was paper, newspapers, magazines, etc. I think that from a very young age, a creator who always impressed me, among many, was Guido Crepax. With that thought-provoking streak and futuristic atmosphere, or not, full of the elaborate charm of the 70s psychedelic.

Guido Crepax

Which creators do you remember first copying?

As I said before, Guido Crepax’s work was very exciting for me, but I don’t remember trying to copy it. I would try, if I had enough skill, to copy several others, like Hal Foster, Alex Raymond, Milton Caniff, Will Eisner, Rich Corben, Jack Kirby …

Who was the creator that you first thought ‘I’m going to be as good as you!’?

I liked comic books as well as great painting, and I thought I could become a Picasso, because I also admired him a lot, lol … And I was already making my oil paintings, around 1981, or even earlier, I don’t have enough strong memory to go further than that, lol …

Picasso

Which creator or creators do you currently find most inspiring?

Currently I see Mattotti as a great artist in drawing and painting, I like neo-expressionists like Baselitz, Immendorff, Penck (RIP) and several other painter artists who created great canvases mainly in the 80s.

Which creators do you most often think about?

I don’t think much about the work of others, I have seen and discovered several artists through the internet, mainly instagram. I like informalism, creative freedom and jobs that always surprise.

Can you name the first three creative peers that come into your head and tell a little bit about why?

Casaes, is an artist I know and lives nearby, he does a very exciting job, has a touch of mystery and the line keeps that dark atmosphere even talking about everyday things.

Rafael Sica (here, here and here), as well as the first one I mentioned, also makes comics and besides the apparently simple line, his characters use a very interesting and unusual body expression in the comics.

Ordinário, 2010 – Rafael Sica

Finally, I know another artist that I cannot fail to mention, Fábio Zimbres, who is exceptionally expressive and surprising, has a totally free streak and I think it is up to great modern and contemporary painters.

Fabio Zimbres

Finally, can you tell us a bit about your recent work and yourself?

I am working daily with drawing and painting, I try not to create a border between drawing and painting techniques, I always use brushes and acrylic paint, on any type of support, but I prefer paper. I use work as a pure form of expression and keep a lot of what I saw and see from comic books, taking this narrative mixed with my own idiosyncrasies to my work.

Thank you very much for taking the time to fill this out and let us into your mind.

L u s t

Small (press) oaks – Ken Eppstein

Ken Eppstein is a good man to know in comics. He works hard to be fair to all of the creators he’s published. I like his tastes as well, so I think you’ll find very good work, including his own, in the comics he’s published.

I like that he’s interested in quantifying rather than guessing what people need, researching and getting data in to inform his work. It’s an approach I admire. His recent surveys have been supported by Fieldmouse Press’s SOLRAD site.

 

Ken Eppstein

Find Ken here

website          twitter          instagram          facebook

 

 

Can you tell us a bit about the first creator whose work you recognised?

You know, I think it was Curt Swan. One of the first books I ever owned was the hardback “Superman from the 30s to the 70s” collection. Still have it… Two copies actually! A nice one and my original copy with no dustjacket and a shredded spine. Lots of artists in there, but Curt Swan was the guy whose work was still in comic racks.

 

Which creators do you remember first copying?

I started answering this question by saying that it was probably one of the X-Men or Legion of Superheroes guys, but the more I thought about it, I’m pretty sure it was actually Jim Davis. I remember copying Garfield for a handmade birthday or Mother’s Day card or something. I can’t remember any specific copying before that.

Garfield
Garfield

 

Who was the creator that you first thought ‘I’m going to be as good as you!’?

I honestly don’t know that I’ve ever had this thought. At least not phrased that way about a specific artist. I will say that as I worked with artists, writing scripts and seeing their interpretations of my work, I gained confidence in my own ability to do it on my own.

I did for many years think about artists I could never be as good as. Technically adept artists, mostly. I guess I still think that framed as a matter of technical skill, there are many artists that have a more sophisticated skill set than I ever will.  Most who have dedicated themselves to that aspect of the craft, in fact. I don’t, though, conflate that craftsmanship with “good” or “bad” anymore. As a teenager, I realized that some of my favorite musicians are technically limited but are still able to create works of emotional and cultural depth. I now think the same thing is true of comic arts, but for some reason it took me longer to get there.

 

Which creator or creators do you currently find most inspiring?

Lynda Barry.  I took her five day “Writing the Unthinkable Workshop” last summer and all of my friends are tired of me talking about it. I went into that workshop a fan and came out an acolyte. She totally changed the way I create and the way I talk to other people about creating.

Lynda Barry

Which creators do you most often think about?

Other creator you mean, right? Because I’m pretty self-centered.

I don’t think I know. I care about a lot of creators.

Can you name the first three creative peers that come into your head and tell a little bit about why?
Bob Corby (of Back Porch Comics and SPACE): Maybe not so much my peer as my hero in terms of small press life. No one works harder for his community.

Bob Corby
Bob Corby

Timmy Wade, my coffee shop buddy who just recently hung together his first self-published comic after years of fretting about it. (Saphead comics.  Its not just good, its great!)

Saphead comics - Timmy Wade
Saphead comics – Timmy Wade

 

Pat Redding Scanlon who is my favorite current collaborator in a lot of ways. So talented and one of the few artists who live at the same intersection of punk rock and comic fandom as I do.

Pat Redding Scanlon

 

Outside of comics I’d say The New Bomb Turks, the first group of rock ‘n roll weirdos to take me in when I moved to Columbus. Also, almost entirely responsible for my garage punk record obsession.

Steve Anderson, my friend who has run a pirate radio station, written an excellent short story collection titled “1976,” guitarist and singer of the band I’m With Stupid, and filmed truly independent movies budgeted solely on beer and wit.

Bob Calhoun author of “Beer, Blood and Cornmeal”, “Shattering Conventions” and an upcoming collection of San Francisco true crime stories.

 

Bob Calhoun
Bob Calhoun

Finally, can you tell us a bit about your recent work and yourself?

My most recent project, including works in progress are:

What Have I Done For You Lately #1: A zine with my current WIP and sketchbook selections.

How to Collect Comics The Nix Way #1: A zine about the creative side of comic collecting, featuring illustrations and short fictions inspired by comics purchased at a comic-con.

Currently working on an illustrated novel titled “On Tour With Roy Lee Hood” and a graphic memoir about opening my first comic shop “What The Hell Is A Rudy Goose?”

WIP - Ray's Short Childhood
WIP – Ray’s Short Childhood

I’m a writer, cartoonists, and publisher from Columbus, Ohio.  In addition to my own rock music and record store themed imprint Nix Comics, I’ve been a contributor to the Columbus Alive, Red Stylo Media Comics, Rocker Magazine, Roctober Magazine, WFMU Rock and Soul Ichiban, and the satirical comic website, The Outhouse.

Thank you very much for taking the time to fill this out and let us into your mind.

Surfers' Love Call

 

all art copyright and trademark its respective owners.

content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

 

 

Small (press) oaks – Morgan Gleave

I first saw Morgan Gleave’s work on the 1977-2000AD group for a strip in The ’77 magazine that they publish. I immediately loved the character design and graffiti-styled cartooning. I was struck with a memory of Samurai Jam by Andi Watson, not so much in style or layout, but in the life of the line and world design.

I’ve found Morgan to be a very positive person, both in his posts and in the interactions I’ve had with him. I know it shouldn’t matter, but there’s something of that positive and fun attitude that glows out of his work. It’s fun, daft but also deftly giving to the audience.

Morgan Gleave photo

You can find Morgan here

website          ko-fi          twitter          facebook

 

Here’s Morgan

Can you tell us a bit about the first creator whose work you recognised?

Hmmmm… Probably Maurice Sendak, creator of Where the Wild Things Are. That book and In the Night Kitchen were my favourites when I was little. I still have my original copy of In the Night Kitchen, complete with crayon scribbles!

 

Which creators do you remember first copying?

Kevin O’Neill and Carlos Ezquerra. 2000ad was the first comic I bought every week. I did some huge copies of Ezquerra’s take on The Stainless Steel Rat and Angelina, which my stepdad mounted and framed for me. They’re in my old portfolios in the attic…

Stainless Steel Rat drawn by Carlos Ezquerra
Stainless Steel Rat drawn by Carlos Ezquerra

 

Who was the creator that you first thought ‘I’m going to be as good as you!’?

Probably O’Neill. I copied a lot of his Nemesis artwork, and he definitely influenced me for a long time.

Nemesis the Warlock art Kevin O’Neill written by Pat Mills
Nemesis the Warlock art Kevin O’Neill written by Pat Mills

Which creator or creators do you currently find most inspiring?

Mike Mignola is my biggest influence, as a writer and an artist. Although my style has definitely become my own, he is without doubt my favourite storyteller. Mal Earl is amazing too, we’ve struck up an incredible friendship over working on The ’77. I love his style and use of colours.

The Prodigal - Mal Earl
The Prodigal – Mal Earl

Which creators do you most often think about?

Mignola! There’s probably tons more, but I keep going back to him!

Hellboy - Mike Mignola

Can you name the first three creative peers that come into your head and tell a little bit about why?

Pete Fowler

My stepdad… he saw I had talent and encouraged me to draw and be creative. I followed in his footsteps and became a graphic designer. Pete Fowler… another HUGE influence and inspiration, I love the worlds and characters he creates. Great music too! Ed Doyle… we met over The ’77, have become good friends, and I’m working on some great stuff with him. He’s so positive and encouraging. Lovely chap.

Kazana art by Ed Doyle
Kazana art by Ed Doyle

Finally, can you tell us a bit about your recent work and yourself?

This year has been crazy… In the first week of January, I was asked to send art to LA for a skate video premiere, Tic Tac Skate School reached out and asked me to recreate their logo (I’ve done TONS for them since, and am an ambassador for the school), and was contacted by The ’77, which was a dream come true… PUBLISHED COMICS! I’m now working on LOTS of strips for them.

portrait
portrait

Having grown up on comics and skateboarding, this year has seen so many of my dreams come true. I’ve had comics published, designed stickers and clothing for Tic Tac, and my first skateboard deck will be out soon. I’ve also been interviewed for an amazing podcast, The Mouth of Manliness, who I’ve supported since they started last year… it’s about masculinity and mental health, with a huge dose of creativity thrown in.

I had a huge breakdown last year, and nearly gave up on comics completely. But I started skateboarding again, and slowly started writing and drawing again. I’ve done more comics this year than ever before. And I’ve won online skate competitions! I’m in quite a good place now… I can genuinely say I’m happy for the first time in years.

Cat
Happy Cat – work in progress

Thank you very much for taking the time to fill this out and let us into your mind.

Thank you!

Morgan Gleave image 3
Morgan Gleave

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.

content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

 

 

Small (press) oaks – Daniel Bristow-Bailey

AC3_p04
Anxious Comics – issue 3 page 4

I first saw Daniel Bristow-Bailey’s work when he offered up free copies of his prose zine Dog. I ordered it on the strength of the cover, Dog handwritten above a very detailed drawing of a frog. It made me laugh, there was something oddly significant in that juxtaposition, couldn’t tell you why, but there was.
Shortly after that he started his Anxious Comics series, which is a fast paced, underground influenced mash series that has a lot of nonsense and yet some very powerful moments. It’s daft, but also on point and so, exactly what I enjoy.

He’s an eclectic creator and has a set of skills that make his work pop.

 

You can find him here

shop

Use the discount code ZINELOVE10 for a 10% discount on anything you buy. Valid until the end of 2020.

instagram                      twitter                      facebook

 

Screaming_p02
Screaming page 2

Can you tell us a bit about the first creator whose work you recognised?

It would have been someone from 2000AD. I remember being very excited by Kevin O’Neill’s run on Nemesis and Simon Bisley’s painted artwork for Sláine. If I look at Bisley’s stuff now I find it hard to get past the grotesque anatomy, but as with people like Todd MacFarlane in the US he pushed past his technical limitations with a raw energy that appealed to adolescent boys. I don’t mean that as snootily as it sounds! Adolescent boys can be fierce critics.

 

Which creators do you remember first copying?

My mum, who should get most of the credit for teaching me to draw, always strongly discouraged me from copying directly, but I came pretty close to it with Moebius! He always makes it look so (deceptively) easy that it’s hard not to have a go oneself.

moebius_edena
Moebius – Edena

Who was the creator that you first thought ‘I’m going to be as good as you!’?

That’s an interesting question. Probably Gilbert Shelton. I started reading the Freak Brothers when I was far too young (got to thank my mum again for that) and that “underground” style with lots of fine linework and cross-hatching seemed to be achievable with the materials I had at home. I think the Shelton influence still shows in my black-and-white stuff.

Shelton_freakbros
Gilbert Shelton – Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers

Which creator or creators do you currently find most inspiring?

In terms of comics, I’ve recently discovered Al Columbia. I can’t remember the last time I found an artist who really disturbed me like his stuff does. Even the more restrained stuff has an evil, haunted quality. The book I’ve got (Pim and Francie, Fantagraphics, 2009) feels like a cursed object, like the Necronomicon in Lovecraft’s stories, or the video cassette in the Ring. It’s a great example of text, illustration and book design all working together.

I’ve been reading a lot of Nabokov. He’s one of those writers I keep coming back to. Sometimes I like to think about how you could do a graphic novel of “Pale Fire”. The first half of the book is a very long poem, written by one fictitious character, and the second half is a collection of footnotes to the poem, written by a second fictitious character, who has stolen the manuscript and is preparing an unauthorised edition of the poem. As the notes digress further and further from the text of the poem, another narrative emerges, that may or may not be “true”, so it would probably be impossible to do a graphic novel adaptation, but thinking about how one might do impossible things is often creatively rewarding.

 

Which creators do you most often think about?

Lynch_TwinPeaks
David Lynch – Twin Peaks

Aside from the people I’ve mentioned already, I think a lot about David Lynch. I’ve always liked his stuff but Twin Peaks: The Return (2017) absolutely blew me away. There were points I was watching that when I thought “I didn’t know you could do that with television”. I think whenever a work expands your ideas about what’s possible within a particular medium you know you’re in the presence of real Art with a capital A. I love the sense of mystery in Lynch’s stuff, which I think comes from his letting the subconscious take the lead in the creative process – he talks a lot about using ideas or imagery from dreams, or meditation. It’s a process I’ve consciously been emulating with “Anxious Comics”.

Can you name the first three creative peers that come into your head and tell a little bit about why?

Gareth Hopkins - NO NEW IDEAS

 

 

 

Gareth Hopkins, because I’ve just finished doing a page for his “no new ideas” project. It was great fun getting to paint over a copy of one of his pages. Gareth posts a lot of his process online and I’ve found it inspiring how he reworks and recycles stuff. His work has definitely encouraged me to veer more towards abstraction, and not to be afraid, in comics, of decoupling the text from the image – I think he was a big influence on my one-shot “the Screaming”.

Gareth Brookes. I’ve not talked to Gareth much about process but he seems drawn to ridiculously labour-intensive media, like embroidery or linocuts. As if making comics wasn’t hard enough already! But as I said before, there’s nothing like setting yourself an impossible challenge to get the creative juices flowing. Also, when I look at the spread of stuff he’s got for sale at conventions – a mix of self-published zines and two or three big hardback books published more traditionally, I think it’s where I’d like to be myself in a few years’ time, so I guess he’s kind of a role model for me right now.

 

Hannah Lee Miller
Hannah Lee Miller

Hannah Lee Miller is producing some lovely stuff. I picked up a copy of her zine about condiments at Catford Zine Fair and it’s one of those things that initially seems rather slight and inconsequential but is actually really, really good, it just doesn’t shout about it. Also, Hannah is, in my limited experience, infallibly enthusiastic about other comic / zine people and always ready to help out or lend support where it’s needed. An asset to the scene.

 

Finally, can you tell us a bit about your recent work and yourself?

For a long time I tried to be self-disciplined and only work on one thing at once, but recently I’ve come to accept that I’m happier when I have several projects, preferably in different media, on the go at once.

The last thing I self-published was “The Screaming”, an experimental one-shot comic about dreams and mental health. I wrote about it in some detail for Broken Frontier.

Screaming_p08
Screaming page 8

I’ve got five pages in the upcoming anthology by Obsolete Comics. I’m really excited about this one as it looks like it’s going to be great, and hopefully represents the start of another small comics press. We can never have enough small comics presses.

I’ve also got Anxious Comics, my ongoing series – four issues out to date and the fifth long overdue! My long-term plan with that, if you can call it that, is to keep it going between other projects for as long as it needs to, or until I get bored. At some point it would be nice to do a collected edition.

I’m currently drawing a comic written by Steve Thompson, which he’ll be pitching to publishers soon I think. I like drawing other people’s scripts because it forces me to draw stuff I otherwise wouldn’t think of.

Looking to the longer term, I’m working on a script for a longer-form comic. It’s kind of a superhero thing. But not quite. I’ve got this character who’s kind of my own take on the super-violent costumed vigilantes like the Punisher and Deadpool that were popular when I was a kid, but transplanted to the “real world” of early-noughties London.  It’s pretty bleak. I think it’s funny myself but as with some other stuff I’ve self-published in the past it will probably cause people to express concern for my mental health.

Gareth Huntbegins
Gareth – Hunt Begins – work in progess

Bio: Daniel Bristow-Bailey was born in London in 1978. Growing up during the “dark age” of mainstream comics, he quickly became attracted to the alternative / indie scene and, encouraged by his mum and the bloke in the local comic shop, started drawing his own from an early age. Like many others, he drifted away from comics in his late teens, put off by their uncool image and lack of seriousness compared to grown-up art and literature, but came back to them in recent years as he realised that no-one was going to think he was cool or take him seriously anyway. As well as making his own comics, he draws other people’s scripts and sometimes writes prose fiction. He has a day job working as a mental health person in schools. He lives in Richmond with his wife and two children.

Thank you very much for taking the time to fill this out and let us into your mind.

Gerald
Gerald – work in progress

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.

content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

 

 

Phil Elliott – other things I found along the way

Michel Fiffe

appreciation – http://michelfiffe.com/?p=1851

Interview – https://www.factualopinion.com/the_factual_opinion/2011/10/second-city-the-paul-duncan-phil-elliot-interview.html

First Comic Newshttps://www.firstcomicsnews.com/phil-elliot-interviewed/

Tom Murphy at Broken Frontier reviews In His Cups –http://www.brokenfrontier.com/in-his-cups-collected-tales-from-gimbley-review-phil-elliott-fast-fiction-comics/

Eddie Campbell

http://eddiecampbell.blogspot.com/2008/10/fter-writing-about-british-small-press.html

Eddie Campbell writes about the 80s small press (of which Phil was such an influential part) available on SEQUENTIAL and Kindle:

Dapper John: In the Days of the Ace Rock ‘n’ Roll Club

Kindle (all devices)
SEQUENTIAL (iPad only)
Ed Pinsent
Lambiek.net
Paul Gravett

 

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – guest contributors – art page

Below are some interpretations of Phil’s style or characters, just for fun

Gimbley image is by Graham Cousins and was included in the Infinity #2 which came out in early 1984
Gimbley image by Graham Cousins and was included in the Infinity #2 which came out in early 1984

Deadface - Ilya - with added Phil Elliott pastiche
Deadface – Ilya – with added Phil Elliott pastiche

Gimbley - Robert Wells fan art
Gimbley – Robert Wells fan art

Gimbley - Mark Russell Olson fanart
Gimbley – Mark Russell Olson fanart

 

 

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – A gallery

Part of the reason this has taken so long is the search for images or, more fairly, my reaction to looking at Phil’s work curated on the internet. Not only is there a lot, but it’s all damn good and i could lose myself in it completely.

Below is a gallery of every image I sourced for these articles, just so you can see them all in one place and realise the breadth of ability at work.

 

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – guest contributor – round-up

Martin Hand
Martin Hand

Martin Hand – comic writer and artist

The Suttons
The Suttons

Phil’s sheer craft and drawing ability – his ability to keep going is to be admired. The Suttons is my favourite work by him and I hope he’ll do a complete collection one day soon.

He’s like the British Herge – he’s got a very distinctive style – which will fondly remembered – unlike many of his 80s small press peers he’s still doing new material with new people and still evolving.

I don’t know Phil in real life beyond Facebook but I was very pleased to buy some Suttons pages off him – and I’m always pleased when he likes my work on f/b… 🙂

 

 

Ed ‘Ilya’ Hillyer – comic writer and artist

I was pondering repro of a panel from Deadface (with Eddie Campbell) where I pastiched his style for a flashback sequence of a panel or two… filling the bosses’ quiver!

Deadface - Ilya - with added Phil Elliott pastiche
Deadface – Ilya – with added Phil Elliott pastiche

 

Simon Russell
Simon Russell

Simon Russell – comic writer, artist and editor

The tone of Phil’s writing, both visual and textual, is entirely unique to him. No matter what style he adopts, it’s this that makes it stand out immediately as a Phil Elliott comic.

 

John Freeman
John Freeman

John Freeman – comic writer and editor

I feel like I’ve read Phil’s work my entire adult life, since the first time I discovered it on the Fast Fiction stand at the Westminster Comic Marts. An extraordinary and I would say influential talent on the UK independent scene, constantly surprising and innovative, the quintessential “tryer” who deservedly made it to the mainstream and whose work continues to delight. Yet, despite knowing Phil’s work, he isn’t a creator I know socially, so I have no scandal to relate!

I’m just hoping for more of his work and that more people support it.

Gimbley
Gimbley

 

Morgan Gleave

Morgan Gleave

I feel like I’ve been aware of Phil’s work for as long as I’ve been reading comics… certainly since I started collecting seriously in the 80s. Phil is a legendary creator who deserves serious recognition for his place in comics history, in the U.K. if nowhere else!

I love the inherent simplicity of Phil’s work… it’s a beautiful style, that has remained consistent for a long time. I imagine Phil goes through a lot of plotting and planning to get this timeless feel.I was very honoured to have one of my drawings reinterpreted recently by Phil for issue 1 of The 77.

I feel like I’m just getting to know Phil personally, having connected over our work on The 77. He’s been lovely about my work and very supportive. 

 

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – guest contributor – Laurence Campbell

Laurence Campbell
Laurence Campbell

Laurence Campbell – comic artist

Hello Phil, you won’t have a clue who I am but I just wanted to say I have fond memories of your work.

The cover to Escape magazine #3. Art by Chris Long
The cover to Escape magazine #3. Art by Chris Long

There was a time I had felt I had grown out out comics like X-Men and was looking for something more, something with a bit more depth and something I could relate to. At the time comics were changing, there was a buzz in the air. I was still far away from being a comic artist at that point but I was looking for influences and different styles, I was eating this stuff up.

I discovered independent titles like Escape Magazine which at the time I found at the time a little too adult for me and later Deadline which seemed to speak to me more back then.

Deadline

 

Later when I was starting to think about being a comic artist I would l see your name on books when browsing in Forbidden Planet, looking for something more. It was good to see comics which were not done the Marvel way when being told at the time that was the only way to do it. It gave me the confidence to carry on.

 

I also have fond memories of UKCAC’s, going at first as a fan and later going with the start of a portfolio and seeing your name on the pin up in the booklets for the years I went. I still have some of them now. Your image in UKCAC88 looking back is wonderful. I wish I had bought it! Full of confidence and just a wonderful image.

So, thank you for broadening my horizons.

Laurence Campbell.

 

 

 

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – guest contributor – Paul Rainey

Paul Rainey

Paul Rainey – comic writer and artist

Escape Issue 5 Phil Elliott cover
Escape Issue 5 Phil Elliott cover

During my teens in the 1980s, I made a purposeful decision to broaden the comics I read from UK newsagent and American superhero to now include Escape, the comics art magazine. It was here that I read Eddie Campbell and Phil Elliot’s work for the first time. Obviously, this seemed like quite a leap, but Phil’s rounded, energetic, Tin Tin styled drawings helped with my transition. I loved Phil’s work. It enjoyed being a comic. It rolled around in the language that all other comics had foolishly forgotten about and then invented its own. There has always been a sense of contentment in his work even back then, of an artist comfortable in his own skin.

If fourteen year-old me ever thought that Phil’s work is limited to only carrying his unique vision, then I was proved wrong very quickly. Early on, Escape published Doc Chaos, a sci-fi strip written by David Thorp which I loved and still have my copies of. Phil’s priority was never style or mood at the expense of the story.

Another collaboration I enjoyed very much was Second City, a four issue series written by Paul Duncan and published by Harrier Comics. Then there was The Greenhouse Warriors, written by Glenn Dakin and self-published, all copies of which I have also kept to this day. I was so impressed by the latter, that I contacted their printer and used them for my 1990s comic, Memory Man. Recently, Phil has reprinted strips he drew with Eddie Campbell for Sounds during the 1980s. What I like about these works, and others, is that it’s often difficult to see where Phil ends and the collaborator begins.

 

I think that Phil is definitely under appreciated. I often wonder how differently he may be perceived by the comics-hive-mind today if he had had the opportunity to illustrate a years in the making graphic novel written by Alan Moore. At a time when Phil’s peers were chasing gigs at 2000 AD and DC, Phil was working for Sounds and Fantagraphics and pitching Real Ghost Busters strips to Marvel UK. (This approach to work that I always imagined Phil to have, has been an influence on me). I remain delighted by Phil continuing to make comics like Malty Heave with Rob Wells and The Last Man with Michael Powell. The man’s an inspiration.

 

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – guest contributor – Russel Mark Olson

Russell Mark Olson
Russell Mark Olson

Russell Mark Olson – comic creator

 

Elliott is one of the best cartoonists in the biz. In an industry cluttered by the scritchy-scratchy uncanny valley of layered upon layered digitally produced comics, Phil’s work represents the clear directness of deliberate storytelling. No superfluous marks. Everything on the page is in service to the narrative. There’s no ego, just consummate craftsmanship.

ES EF - page
ES*EF – page

 

Coming from the States, I was completely unaware of Elliott’s body of work until very recently. Ever since, I’ve been trying to make up for that shortcoming. Those of us in the current barnstorming UK indie press scene owe so much to him and others like Paul Grist and Eddie Campbell. He deserves a place on the Mount Rushmore of indie comics and should be required reading in all corners of the industry and beyond.

 

As I said, I’ve only recently come to his work (after backing ES*EF), but very recently, I purchased a prototype promo piece from him and he included as a surprise, a page of original art, presumably from an upcoming issue of Malty Heave. To top it all off, it was mailed rolled up inside an old box of clingfilm. Diamonds in the rough and all that.

 

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – guest contributor – Alex Fitch

Alex Fitch
Alex Fitch

Alex Fitch – pod cast and radio presenter

Taboo #3 featuring Phil Elliott - Cover by Michael Zulli
Taboo #3 featuring Phil Elliott – Cover by Michael Zulli

I first came across Phil’s work in the form of a couple of memorable short stories in Steve Bissette’s Taboo anthology, and then probably like many people saw his name crop up as a sympathetic colourist on a number of British comics. His colouring of Paul Grist’s work and British kids’ comics has been great, and it’s a shame that although he’s a talented colourist, there haven’t been more mainstream comics that he’s had the chance to write or draw. The ones he has been involved with have been terrific, in particular his Cold War aliens graphic novel – Illegal Alien – that Dark Horse released some years ago.

Illegal Alien - written by James Robinson
Illegal Alien page – written by James Robinson

I think Phil’s place in comics history is to have been part of the terrific Escape generation, making memorable comics in collaboration with the likes of Grist, Glenn Dakin and Eddie Campbell. I don’t think he’s as well known as he deserves to be, but by the people who do know his work, it’s rightly well appreciated.

I came across Phil’s crowdfunding campaigns for his collaborations with Eddie Campbell that were serialised in Sounds magazine; seeing that all three were going to come out as separate volumes, I emailed him to ask if he might bring out a slipcase for the trilogy, when the third one hit kickstarter. We exchanged a few emails and he said that while doing a number of slipcases wouldn’t be viable, he kindly offered to make me a bespoke case to put my copies in, so I have a one of kind box-set of The Mammy, The Wonders of Science and Rodney – The Premonition! (Which was much appreciated)

Phil Elliott - Handmade box set for Alex Fitch
Phil Elliott – Handmade box set for Alex Fitch

 

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – guest contributor – Paul Duncan

Paul Duncan
Paul Duncan

Paul Duncan – writer

 

Phil is the restless giant of the small press. Since I have known him, off and on, since the early 1980s, Phil has explored every avenue and type of publication. Writing, drawing, lettering, colouring, editing, publishing – he can do it all. Fearlessly.

He is prolific. He is diverse of subject. He is relentless. He cannot be pinned down. He supports so many other creators and publications. He is willing and giving. He delivers!

He is a collaborator. He will write for others, he will draw for others. He will support others.

He is a leader. He was there at the start of Fast Fiction and helped kickstart a movement of diverse talents. He spearheaded many titles for Harrier in the UK, giving many talents a wider audience, and then leapfrogged into America, doing likewise with titles for Fantagraphics, Slave Labor, and Dark Horse.

Undoubtedly, Phil’s greatest artistic achievement is Gimbley, a character who is all too human and fallible, and who may be occasionally melancholic, but ultimately understands the ironic qualities of life.

As for history? Fuck history – his work will live on!

By 1986 Phil had built up a diverse portfolio of work (Gimbley, Doc Chaos, Sounds) and I had not, but we both thought it would be a good idea to go to Paris, visit the BD publishers, and try to sell our ideas. We arrived in Paris, and walked along the Seine, admiring the Bouquinistes. Just as we arrived at a stall selling comics, a motorbike pulled up, threw down a pile of new comics bound by string, and whizzed off. The comic at the top of the bundle was Second City, a comic Phil and I had worked on together, published by Harrier. How auspicious was that?! Needless to say, it wasn’t. We visited publisher after publisher and they were not interested in what we had to sell, not helped by our lack of the French language. Still, the publishers arranged the meetings just before lunch, and so Phil and I dined heartily at the publishers’ expense, dissecting whole fish and quaffing wine and coffee.

 

best

-paul duncan

Phil Elliott – guest contributor – Michael Powell

Michael Powell
Michael Powell

Michael Powell – comic writer

 

Phil is a fantastic storyteller. It’s amazing how many different genres he can turn his hand to and yet still be recognisably Phil. We’ve worked on horror and sci-fi together, I’ve seen Phil produce work that’s funny, surreal and philosophical, sometimes all at the same time. He’s also a great writer too.

 

 

Phil has been there at every key stage in contemporary comics history. From Fast Fiction to Sounds, Escape, !GAG! and Blite, Phil’s always been there. He’s illustrated comics for mainstream publishers too, bringing that unique Phil Elliott style to Ghostbusters and Judge Dredd.

Judge Dredd
Judge Dredd

Phil’s been producing comics professionally since the 1970s but he keeps getting better! The new art Phil’s produced for Circus DeNiro is I think some of the best of his incredible career.

 

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – guest contributor – Nevs Coleman

Nevs Coleman
Nevs Coleman

Nevs Coleman– reviewer

Tupelo - page 2

Matt DeGennaro and Phil Elliott’s Tupelo is sadly now out of print (although you can pick up copies on Amazon), Tupelo was originally published by Slave Labor Graphics in 2003 as a four issue mini series, and then published as a trade paperback featuring a cd by cult band Famous Monsters. I was working in the late Comic Showcase at the time and was staggered by how much each issue just… got it. Understood and recreated the atmosphere in my head. The sticky floors, the toilets with broken doors, the kids proudly showing off their home-made ‘X’s, the drone of the men who are too old in the head to be there. The Outside that oppressed with silent hostility. The outrage at the huckster hypnotist who stands in for every soulless advertising exec who preys on the insecurities they created and profits from them with promises of false hope.

Tupelo - page

They are, indeed, brilliant. Phil is some kind of Art Ninja Genius, distilling the page down to only its essential lines. Like a Toth, a Parobeck or a Kurtzman, this process looks like it’s easy, but it’s really the total opposite. Lesser talents can hide their weakness behind flashy layouts, unnecessary cross-hatching and other short cuts. If you’re working as Phil does, every flaw is going to scream out of the page at you. It never happens in Tupelo. The story pages are a beautiful discordant symphony. The… backmatter (hate that word) is both inspiring and a perfect approximation of prison letters, Zig Zag/Maximum Rock ’N’ Roll era music journalism and Punk Manifesto, with one issue containing an ideology that makes the likes of Fight Club sound like playing RATM too loud in your bedroom after your Mum’s asked you to clean up your room.

Tupelo

Phil is an astounding talented artist who’s just published In His Cups: Collected Tales Of Gimbley. It’s bloody good stuff and you should obviously all go buy it.  Ideally, he’d be on a regular book and there are no end of comics being published that if I were given editorial responsibilities on the title, I’d just say “Give it to Phil. He’ll make it work.” Personally, I’d hire him to redraw all those Todd Loren knock-off rock biographies as and when he felt like it while he got on with whatever made him happy.

 

 

 

 

 

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – guest contributor – Robert Wells

Robert Wells
Robert Wells

Robert Wells – comic writer and artist

 

Phil is a great artist who seems to be able to draw anything and make it look easy (FYI, he is also really good at DIY) and his slightly surreal / not-quite-autobio stories are like poems in comic form.

(Editor’s note – he really is – look below!)

Although he’s worked for all sorts of publishers in the UK and US, Phil has a particularly important place in the history of British indie comics. The letters exchanged between Phil and Eddie Campbell, as well as the various rejection letters and other correspondence that they published at the back of the three collections of their Sounds strips, are as important and interesting as the strips themselves. Those books really should be collected by a big publisher, as should Phil’s Gimbley strips.

Malty-Heave-01-S1
Malty Heave

I met Phil for the first time in 2014, in the foyer of the Odeon in Maidstone.  I was living in Maidstone at the time and we had a mutual friend (a neighbour of mine who’d been to college with him) who kept promising to introduce us. When she moved away, still not having introduced us, I sent Phil a message through Facebook to say hello, and he replied asking if I wanted to see Guardians of the Galaxy with him and his nephew. So, we met, we saw the film, and after we’d seen it, we went back to his house, my wife joined us, and Phil and his wife cooked us dinner, having never met us before.

We’ve remained friends since then and I have shared tables with him (or had the table next to his) at several events. I still remember the amazing, Moebius-like, A3-sized drawing he did of a spaceship landing on an alien world that he effortlessly (or seemingly-effortlessly) produced the first time I sat next to him at an event, and then sold way too cheaply. I wish I’d bought it. However, as one of Phil’s Patreon supporters, I’ve received a lot of other art from him over the last couple of years, as well as various other bits he’s sent me, like the paintings he did for Department of the Peculiar Goes POP! issues 1 and 2. It was a pleasure to get to work with him on Malty Heave #1 and I’m looking forward to working with him again on #2.

Department of the Peculiar Goes Pop - pin-up
Department of the Peculiar Goes Pop – pin-up

Phil is a generous artist and a generous friend.

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – guest contributor – Darryl Cunningham

Darryl Cunningham
Darryl Cunningham

Darryl Cunningham – comic writer and artist

 

Phil Elliott has always been an inspiration to me. I first got involved in comics way back in the 1980s and was part of a kind-of second wave of creators who were part of the British Small Press scene back then, who gravitated around Paul Gravett’s Fast Fiction mag. People who were already established on the scene at the time included Ed Pinsent, Woodrow Phoenix, Ryan Hughes and…Phil Elliott. Phil’s work was astonishing to me, because he seems to draw nothing from the traditional British style of cartooning and instead took from the clear line style of European cartooning – something rare in British comics. He was one of those people who appeared fully formed with a mature talent immediately. A big contrast to my own inadequate scribblings (And didn’t I know it).

ES EF - page
ES*EF – page

Years later I had chance to work with Phil on a couple of projects as a writer. At first I wrote him full scripts, but as the work developed i wrote less and less, because he is so talented that I realised that I could just leave it to him to come up with better visuals than I could ever describe. All he needed was the briefest panel description and the dialogue and he could run with it, filling the panels with action and humour. Phil is effortlessly easy to work with. He is incredible talented and modest. I’d work with him again in a second if he ever wanted to.

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – guest contributor – Dan Abnett

Dan Abnett
Dan Abnett

Dan Abnett– comicbook writer and novelist

Phil is one of the real unsung giants of British comics.

His work is always touching and utterly distinctive, and I’ve always thought it an injustice that it hasn’t been more widely appreciated. Perhaps it’s the very nature of what he does best – very quiet and personal stories, often with a logic bordering on realistic dreaming – that has resulted in him being overlooked far too often. His stories seldom shout, and thus may get drowned out by the more flamboyant work of others.

Pool Tales
Pool Tales

Admirably, he has never compromised to “fit in” – his style remains true and perfect and unique. His work is long overdue the appraisal and proper recognition it deserves. In my opinion, he is a true artist – by which I mean singular creative voice – and his place in British comics over the last decades has been massively underrated… as is so often the case with true artists. Plus, of course, he’s an enormously nice person.

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – guest contributor – David Hathaway-Price

David Hathaway-Price
David Hathaway-Price

David Hathaway-Price – artist, writer, editor and curator of online zine archive

 

A small tribute to Phil Elliott

In His Cups - Collected Tales of Gimbley
In His Cups – Collected Tales of Gimbley

A couple of years ago, Tony Esmond was kind enough to invite me onto the ‘The Awesome Comics Podcast’, to chat about my fanzine archive, and to talk about all things fannish. I’m pretty useless behind a microphone (not helped by having a strong aversion/phobia about talking on the phone at all), but I was pleased to be asked near the end of the interview to recommend a small press comic that I thought people should read… The fact that my choice was ‘In His Cups: Collected Tales from Gimbley’ perhaps gives you an idea of how much I respect Phil, and just how highly I regard his work. Being a gentleman of ‘a certain age’, who often looks back and tries to make sense of his past and poor choices in quiff height, this collection really spoke to me. Of course, the frankly exquisite art may also have something to do with my appreciation of the work.

Mr Day and Mr Night with Glenn Dakin
Mr Day and Mr Night with Glenn Dakin

Right from the very start of comics fandom there had always been Strip zines of course, but the Fast Fiction explosion (and the proliferation of High Street Print Shops, which meant that you could get your zine printed off that day, rather than hanging around and waiting weeks for a ‘proper’ printer to fit you in somewhere) gave an outlet for people to start telling all kinds of stories (slice of life, rather than men in tights). Still living in the depths of South Wales in the early ‘80’s, and only visiting London very rarely, I missed out on both the ‘Crackers’ evenings and the opportunity to visit the Fast Fiction table as much as I would have liked. A shame, as I probably missed out on the great majority of the comics being published by the small press at that time. Without Phil, and the rest of the guys and girls paving the way, we might not have ended up with the thriving small press scene we are enjoying now.

 

If I remember correctly, I first contacted Phil to ask if he would give his permission for me to add his strip zine ‘ELIPSE’ (1977) to the archive; generous to a fault he of course agreed. Not only that, but about three years ago he contacted me, explained he was soon going to be moving home, and asked if I would like his zine collection? He wanted no money, he just wanted to know that they were going to someone who would look after them. If that doesn’t give you an idea of the man’s character and generosity, I don’t know what would.

The Day the General Came - with James Robinson

Thank you, Phil, you’re a treasure.

 

David Hathaway-Price

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – guest contributor – David Hine

David Hine

David Hine – comic creator

I first met Phil Elliott in the late 70s. I was aware of him through the fanzine culture and we were both contributing artwork to The Panelologist fanzine, which also featured some art by David Lloyd among others. I contributed to the fanzine Elipse, co-edited by Phil and soon after that we met for the first time at the UK Comic Art Convention, probably in 1979. I had a fanzine of my own, Joe Public Comics, and was bloody hopeless at selling it. We didn’t have tables, so it was a case of approaching people and persuading them to buy a copy. Phil grabbed a bundle of my ‘zines, went off and sold a couple for me. I was impressed.

Elipse fanzine 1977
Elipse fanzine 1977

This weekend I dug out some of my old fanzines and came across Elipse #3 – the very issue that I had contributed to. I had forgotten that this was the first time anyone published one of my full comic-strips, a lightweight horror story called “A Video-phone brings you so much closer to the one you love.”
In the editorial section, Phil had written up my bio where it states that “His major complaint with comics is the way commercialism perverts artistic talent, and says he won’t be satisfied until we get rid of deadlines and money.”
That seems a bit presumptuous for someone who had never worked to deadline or been paid for anything. Clearly I had set my sights on a high standard of aritistic integrity. Had I made it in indie comics back then I might have been able to pursue my goal of creating personal comics while starving in a garret. Instead I was cursed to spend a lifetime working to deadlines and getting paid for it.
I had also completely forgotten that when Phil gave me my copy of Elipse at that Comic Con he apologised for “erasing the penis.” I have made it my lifelong quest to get as many penises into comics as humanly possible, with a fair amount of success, but this was the first one to get censored – and in my first non-self-published work too! In retrospect it’s quite interesting because the knobless bloke looks like some kind of gender-neutral character – very advanced for 1978. (Editor’s note – an incident that Phil clearly remembers – check out this interview!)

Elipse - Censored Panel - David Hine
Elipse – Censored Panel – David Hine

We subsequently met up at various comics gatherings, mostly at the Westminster Comics Mart where I also met Paul Gravett who, with Phil and others like Glenn Dakin and Eddie Campbell, had set up the Fast Fiction collective of small press publishers.  Phil went on to work on Paul’s Escape magazine and became something of a superstar of the small press world. I never really fitted in, failed to make it into Escape and ended up on that path to mainstream comics instead.

Vignette Comics
Vignette Comics

The years went by and I pursued an up-and-down career in comics while Phil seemed to disappear from the scene. In the comics world if you don’t turn up at conventions, or at least have an active social media presence, you don’t exist. It’s the rule. When we finally met up again at the Malta Comics Convention in 2017, I apparently greeted Phil with “I thought you were dead!” We had a very pleasant time over the weekend, reminiscing about the old days, as we middle-aged grey-hairs are wont to do. On the way home Phil gave me a copy of In His Cups – The Collected Tales from Gimbley. I had seen a lot of these in various publications but it was only when I read them as a collected body of work that I realised just how good they were – surreal, oneiric, often disturbing and always hilarious.

 

Phil’s work with Fast Fiction and Escape has cemented his place in the history of British comics. He went on to work for Marvel UK, Rebellion, Dark Horse, DC, Fantagraphics, a whole string of publishers, collaborating with all kinds of writers, but for me those Gimbley tales stand out as the purest expression of his art. The conceit of a middle-aged man recounting tales from his youth is remarkably effective. I really should have asked Phil how it feels to look back on those stories from the perspective of the middle-aged creator. And also how much of it was autobiographical.
Maybe it’s better not to know.

 

 

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – guest contributor – Paul Gravett

Paul Gravett

Paul Gravett – Publisher and journalist

 

Phil Elliott and I go way, way back, to our school days (different school but we’re both Essex boys).

Escape Issue 5 Phil Elliott cover
Escape Issue 5 Phil Elliott cover

Personally, Phil was crucial and instrumental as a friend, artist and designer at two key points in early 1980s UK comics history. First, the creation of Fast Fiction, both the Westminster Central Hall Comic Mart table and the anthology that he and Ian Wieczorek soon evolved out of it, notably designing the cool logo. I remember how Phil, Ian, Eddie Campbell and I used to use the PMT camera at pssst! magazine’s offices in London unofficially on a Saturday morning to reduce and prepare the artworks for FF Magazine’s printing. And secondly came the launch of Escape Magazine in 1983. Peter Stanbury and I picked out a panel by Phil to put inside the subscription prospectus and chose him to draw the first issue’s wraparound cover. Phil even found us our first issue’s printer local to him in Maidstone. We knew his quirky, bittersweet Tales from Gimbley had the spirit, style, suit and quiff that belonged in Escape. Inspired by Hergé, Swarte and more, Phil’s work personified ‘La Ligne Claire Anglaise’.

I’ve continued to admire and enjoy his work since, and it was a delight to have a reunion a few years ago, when we found each other over a lunch in the National Comics Centre in Angoulême during the city’s annual Festival. Neither of us could have imagined back in those old schooldays how far the comics world would change and grow, and how it could bring us back together.

Cheers to you, Phil!

Paul

 

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – guest contributor – Glenn Dakin

Glenn Dakin
Glenn Dakin – creator and collaborator
Man From Cancer - Page
Phil’s work has a beautiful stylised quality, he can draw the most outlandish things and make you accept them.
When I decided to make The Man From Cancer (Marvel UK) all about marine life characters, I knew Phil was the perfect artist for it. If I wanted a character answering the phone, he would draw them as an enormous squid, and it would look weird, but perfectly natural.
Also Phil is a great natural storyteller, I never once had to write him a script for any of our comics, I would just rough out the page, and he would immediately ‘get it.’
To me, Phil is one of the great UK comic artists, a mixture of the aesthetically pleasing ‘clear line’ style, with an almost Ditko-ish nightmare lurking at the edges.
Something that captures that troubling quality to Phil’s work, when I first went to Australia to stay with Eddie Campbell, I wrote a little strip about a dream I had, and my first feelings on arriving in Brisbane. I sent it to Phil to draw up, and he captured something under the surface of my remarks… The strip ended up being printed in Steve Bissette’s horror anthology, Taboo! I was always found it funny that my holiday at Eddie’s ended up in a horror comic…

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – guest contributor – Tom Murphy

Tom Murphy
Tom Murphy

Tom Murphy – publisher, Colossive Press and contributor, Broken Frontier

The clarity of Phil Elliott’s work and his gift for storytelling have made him a master across genres. However, the work of his that has carried me along for the last thirty-odd years is his epic Tales from Gimbley sequence – a wide-ranging series in which a middle-aged man looks back with the benefit of hindsight at the antics of his generously bequiffed younger self.

Back in the day, in the shoes of young Gimbley, I chuckled along in recognition of his misadventures and reflections on drinking, the artistic life, friendships and relationships. Now, looking at them through the other end of the telescope, alongside old Gimbey, I love them just as much for their wistful treatment of memory, emotion and the passage of time.

And, in possibly the biggest thrill of all, I’m now lucky enough to have the original artwork from a few of those iconic pages – pages that I’ve read so often down the years that they are imprinted on my brain. Let’s raise a glass to Phil Elliott – one of the true godfathers of the small press comic scene, as both an artist and an activist.

(In His Cups: Collected Tales of Gimbley is available here, in print or PDF)

image0image1

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – guest contributor – Russell Willis

Russell Willis by Hunt Emerson

Russell Willis – writer and founder of the Sequential comics app for the iPad

Phil Elliott was a massive influence on my me. It was his Gimbley strips in Fast Fiction that helped consolidate my interest in comics outside of superheroes. Had it not been for Phil and his small-press buddies, I would most likely have given up on comics altogether at the age of 13.

Doc Chaos
Doc Chaos

Instead, in 1983, I launched a “non-superhero” fanzine called Infinity and in the editorial of its first issue I wrote about how the work of Phil Elliott had inspired me. In the second issue of that mag, we had a lovely little Gimbley tribute from Graham Cousins.… And I loved featuring reviews of  Escape and Doc Chaos.

The fanzine attracted letters from the notables and upcoming notables of the day but I was truly delighted when I got a letter from Phil – right at the end of the zine’s run.
Running that fanzine was one of the most exciting and formative periods of my life, and without Phil’s work, it probably wouldn’t have happened.
Cheers, Phil

 

Gimbley image is by Graham Cousins and was included in the Infinity #2 which came out in early 1984
Gimbley image by Graham Cousins and was included in the Infinity #2 which came out in early 1984

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – guest contributor – Graham Johnstone

Comic creator Graham Johnstone talks about Phil’s work and influence

 

Page from Dead Trees
Page from Dead Trees

 

I first became aware of the work of Phil Elliott in the mid 1980’s, probably first in Paul Gravett and Peter Stanbury’s Escape, and thereafter in a number of his lovingly assembled self-published comics.

I’d grown up with comics: Marvel had taken me to the point that I considered comics a unique and important art form and wondered what more they might do. I’d seen the American Undergrounds and the more experimental RAW, but Elliott seemed to be part of a distinctly British evolution of comics. In America there seemed to me, on the one hand, the melodrama of Marvel/DC, (and their offshoots into the nascent independents), and the other hand the brilliant, but almost painfully ironic re-appropriation of pop culture RAW. In Britain, I was aware of the gently fictionalised autobiography of (Elliott’s Fast Fiction magazine colleague) Eddie Campbell, but Elliott seemed to have struck on something different: an exploration of personal life and inner dilemmas (like Campbell) yet in a more poetic form. That’s also true of different talents emerging from the Fast Fiction diaspora like Chris Reynolds and Ed Pinsent, but I think Elliott arrived first and the others were most likely influenced, or at the very least, inspired by him. I know he certainly inspired and influenced my own work of the subsequent years, and what we published in Dead Trees.

He has a fine artist’s sensibility, that’s evident not only in his highly personal content and poetic approach, but also in his visual range and experimentation. To explain this, I’m reminded of a famous conflict in painting ‘the battle between line and colour’ with the former favouring detailed draughtsmanship and the latter building up images with tone and colour. To relate this to comics, think of one extreme as the Ligne Claire penmanship made famous by Hergé, and the other as the impressionist brushwork of say Milton Caniff. The early Tales from Gimbley show Europhile Phil absorbing Herge and progressing to the more expressive line work of the Belgian master’s successors. Like Serge Clerc or Yves Chaland,

Yves Chaland

Elliot mastered the art of varying line weights, to create a camera focus depth-of-field effect, while foregrounding the truth-to-materials (another critical hobby-horse) of ink lines on paper. Elliott’s able to balance: black, white and tones; space and detail; cartooning and realism – often in a single page. We can find all of this in a single Tale from Gimbley story involving a salvaged cigarette machine (In his Cups: Collected Tales from Gimbley page 130). If that all sounds the preserve of connoisseurs, let’s not forget that the versatile Elliott could also satisfy the more mainstream demands of Ghostbusters, without losing himself in the process. I could go on and on, the point is though, it’s hard to find examples of comparable stylistic range and mastery in comics or, I’d go further, any other visual art. He radiates a sheer love of drawing, and at his best, artistry with every element of it.

Phil and I met only met once. At around the turn into the 1990’s, I was invited to participate in an exhibition of upcoming local talent at (I think) the first Glasgow Comic Art Convention (GlasCAC), organised by Frank Plowright and colleagues. I bumped into Frank, who told me that someone had liked my work, and would like to meet. I was delighted that it was Phil. He proved as urbane and charming in person as on the page, and his interest in my work probably spurred me to take it into the world and publish Dead Trees. We’d hoped to meet again at UKCAC, sometime in the 90’s. However, by that time I was already juggling comics with a full-time job, homemaking, and a lengthy commute, with the result I didn’t make it to the Con. In those days before instant communication, I wasn’t able to let him know in advance, sadly leaving the impression I’d sauntered round the con and not bothered to find him.

I’ve hung onto my Gimbley pamphlets and picked up Elliott’s published collaborations with other creators. I was delighted to pick up In His Cups, with all his Gimbley work (so far) in a single volume. I’ve always felt Phil never got the full recognition he deserved – compared to say his similarly talented contemporary Eddie Campbell – and it’s a joy to see his increasing profile over recent years. I look forward to seeing ever more of his work and am delighted you’re recognising his achievements in this way.

 

 

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – my personal view

Phil is one of those people that, before I’d even read or seen any of his actual comics, I knew about his work. Doc Chaos adverts literally made up part of my comics experience for so long, without me know that this was the same artist that did Man From Cancer, a strip I loved.

Gimbley
Gimbley

 

Tales From Gimbley was one of those things I saw mentioned and reviewed and talked about without ever having seen it until the last few years. Second City and Illegal Alien surprised me because they were so different in approach to his other work.

Illegal Alien - written by James Robinson
Illegal Alien page – written by James Robinson

The whole Fast Fiction scene was before my time and outside of my ability to get hold of it, as I was in South Wales, away from all the excitement. Escape never made it to my home town either. Deadline did though, and maybe that wasn’t the child of Fast Fiction, but it sure followed it’s precedent and even borrowed from its crowd. A crowd fostered and encouraged in part by Phil as publisher.

Fast Fiction

Phil has continued making human stories throughout his career, Phil’s whole oeuvre is humanity and its absurdity. That’s what makes him unique and constantly appealing, even in genre work, you can feel his focus on people shine. His observation of body language, facial expression, even his page layouts all emphasise the human and their experiences. He adapts his art, but his style is always to focus on the person.

Phil's latest with Michael Powell - Circus DeNiro
Phil’s latest with Michael Powell – Circus DeNiro

Phil is not a chameleon, he doesn’t alter himself. Phil just has an incredible breadth of skill and ability and for each work, he’ll play up one strength or another whilst holding back other skills. He has a very broad set of skills to draw from (pun intended dammit!!) and puts them to good use. He knows what to do and how to make it work, he appears comfortable in many forms and in all parts of his life. Phil really exemplifies the DIY spirit, always making and doing and collaborating and uplifting those around him. Also, if you follow him on facebook, you’ll know he also does a mean line in DIY building as well!

 

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Phil Elliott – great creator

This will be the first in a very occasional series appreciating creators whose work I feel remains vital whilst also casting a long shadow through their creative area. I’m starting this, essentially, to create a record whilst it has a chance to make an impact upon the artists.

Morbidly, the death of another long-term comic artist turned my mind to thinking about how sad it is that they would never get to read the appreciations of their peers, fan and creators inspired by their work. I’ve spent much of this year feeling defeated by 2020, brought low and unable to kick myself into action. But there’s got to be an end to that at some point, and that time is now.

This is me reaching out and trying make a difference in the world again. This is me trying to Kill 2020 with kindness.

There has been one person who has seemed to blossom this year, constantly simmering away, making work. Only, he’s not simmering, he’s boiling over, his work just gets better and grows more amazing yet still wholly singular and recognisably his own.

 

Today, we’ll talk Phil Elliott. Phil emerged in the 80’s with a whole group of other makers associated with Fast Fiction. All of them experimental and all of them deeply involved with life and the comics medium. Phil became publisher of Fast Fiction, then moved onto an involvement with those early black and white comic boom titles put out by Harrier. He’s been published by Fantagraphics, Slave Labor Graphics, Kitchen Sink, Harrier, Marvel UK, L’Echo de Savanes and A Suivre in France, NME, Sounds and Melody Maker.

The thing about Phil is, he’s done much of everything from fully creating comics, lettering, colouring, publishing, self-publishing, even handmaking hardback books. When you talk to people about him, it’s not just this though, and it’s not just his restless approach to style, what really shines through is his generosity, his desire to support and his happiness to collaborate. There are few people you regularly and consistently hear such kind words about, but you talk to people and all you hear is how he has supported them, helped them grow, kindly gifted them things. The man is not just a forefather of the UK small press scene, he’s a silent sun shining over it and helping it to blossom into the incredible and diverse field it is today.

 

 

 

Phil Elliott
Phil Elliott

See Phil’s work here

Patreon              Website           The Art of Phil Elliott – facebook page               twitter

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

 

Small (press) oaks – Ken Meyer Jr

Ken Meyer is probably best known for things that I don’t know him for at all. For me, his work will always be vampires (a friend of mine at uni was absolutely OBSESSED with Vampire the Masquerade and insisted on showing me his work every time I went to her house – it stands up well to tens and tens of views, in case you were wondering!) and Caliber comics mystery come horror series Kilroy Is Here a series I realise I enjoyed a lot having spent a number of hours going back through those issues.
When I started looking for creators whose work I remembered, I was pleased to find out that Ken is a huge fanzine collector/ appreciator and I’ve found many new artists whose work I like because of him.

I know none of that mentions his recent art, but I feel like people are probably already aware of his art – if you’re not you should definitely check him out.

 

Ken Meyer - Head shot

website         store envy        fine art america        pixels

facebook         instagram       twitter 

 

Over to Ken

Can you tell us a bit about the first creator whose work you recognised?

Well, I don’t think I really recognized who I was looking at until long after I started reading comic books (the thing that really started me as an artist). While reading comics in the early seventies I was also reading and contributing to many comic/fantasy fanzines of that time period (and in fact, I write an online monthly column called Ink Stains on this subject, which you can access from my website). Some of the very first comics I remember reading were things like Sea Devils (with those amazing Russ Heath covers). I was made somewhat aware of what came before through things like Steranko’s History of the Comics but didn’t really delve into that with any intelligence until later.

 

Which creators do you remember first copying?

I remember copying (with carbon paper) many things before I started drawing FROM the comics and then drawing on my own. One was an issue of Thor by Neal Adams. I am sure there were many others, but for some reason I remember that.

 

Who was the creator that you first thought ‘I’m going to be as good as you!’?

I doubt I ever really thought like that. Of course, there were many that I WANTED to be as good as, or even be like. Early on it was people like Kirby, John Buscema, Neal Adams, Frank Frazetta (I was consuming a lot of Edgar Rice Burroughs and similar books), etc. The ones that really sparked my interest came a bit later, people like Bernie Wrightson, Barry Smith, Craig Russell, Roger Dean (who illustrated a lot of my favorite music of the time) and then later, with the coming of the independents of the 80’s and some reinvention in the big two, by people such as Frank Miller, Steve Rude, Dave Sim, Howard Chaykin, etc. Some artists became painters and became very important to me, like Jeff Jones, George Pratt, Dave McKean and above all, Bill Sienkiewicz. About that time, I was becoming interested in mainstream illustration, so others played a big part, such as Bernie Fuchs, Bob Peak, Jim Sharpe, Kazuhiko Sano, Mark English, Bart Forbes and many more.

A recent piece commenting on the murder of George Floyd

 

Which creator or creators do you currently find most inspiring?

Bill Sienkiewicz always amazes me. I cannot keep up with comics now, so I am probably missing out on a lot in that field. Fantasy illustrators that might be seen in the pages of the Spectrum annual frequently like Paul Bonner, Rick Berry, and so many more.

 

Which creators do you most often think about?

Part of that answer is just simple exposure…I see Bill’s work very frequently on Facebook, since he posts so often (thank the art godz), for example. Sometimes seeing his work, I am reminded of some of his influences again, who were also mine, such as Peak, mentioned above. Bill has the ability (and experience) to combine lots of media, capture likenesses seemingly effortlessly, be loose and incredibly creative, and also just be very personable and open, which I try to be.

 

Can you name the first three creative peers that come into your head and tell a little bit about why?

Peer is a hard term to truly qualify. I suppose mine might be a combination of independent comic artists, magic artists, and a few commercial illustrators. But, like many, I am harder on myself than anyone else, so I hesitate to put myself on the same level of a lot of people. David Mack comes to mind, since we both started, to some degree, at Caliber Comics in the mid-nineties. However, David has gone on to a whole other level, initially through his creator owned Kabuki series (and all the leaps and bounds his art took while working on it), and then working with Marvel and other huge properties. He is also a really good ambassador for the visual medium, traveling the world and introducing art to communities in far flung locations in a very intelligent and caring manner.

I hate to keep harping on Sienkiewicz, but I would be lying if I did not say he comes to mind for this question as well. Steve Rude does also, for some of the same reasons. Even though I marvelled at his work on Nexus, meeting him later was as easy as anyone. Though he struggles with his own personal demons, he remains giving and accessible…and his work ethic is far beyond question. His love of comics in general always shows in his work and his words.

a new playmat with a Dark Ritual-Big Lebowski mashup
A new playmat with a Dark Ritual/Big Lebowski mashup

There are many fellow Magic artists that could fill this bill, and I have been lucky to have met many of them at the various events in the past. They all possess talent, drive, and skill. Some have an incredible amount of creativity, like Anthony Waters. Some are just beautiful human beings, like Chuck Lukacs. Some are inventive pranksters, like Pete Venters. Some have forged very individual styles, like Drew Tucker and Richard Kane Ferguson. I am just lucky to know many of them.

 

Finally, can you tell us a bit about your recent work and yourself?

I have been a commercial artist since about 1976 (starting as a work study student in college). I have worked in many industries and for many companies, including comics (Marvel, Dark Horse, Image, Caliber, Revolutionary, etc), online games (Everquest), paper games; (Magic, VTES, Imajica, Dragonstorm, Rage, Vampire the Masquerade and many other White Wolf/Onyx Path properties, Redemption, Legend of the Five Rings, Shadowfist, more), various ad agencies and companies (Bell Helmets, RAINN, American Cancer Society, etc), and many private commissions and freelance work. My personal interests include film, tv, reading (favorite authors include Stephen King, Chuck Palahniuk, Christopher Moore), music (I have waaay too many cds), and tennis.

I started working exclusively on a freelance basis about 18 years ago (having worked full time art related jobs while doing freelance at the same time for many years before that). Most of the work I do tends to be continuing work for White Wolf/Onyx Path and a few other companies, as well as varied commissions from all sorts of people doing all sorts of subjects. A fair amount of it tends to be Magic based, such as the work I would sell and show at events, or work like altered cards, playmat sketches, artist proof card paintings, etc. But, like most freelance illustrators, I need to be able to do pretty much anything if I want to make a living! As for recent or current work, I have a few Onyx Path illustrations due by the end of this month (June), a private commission for a returning client I am working on now, and some altered cards after that. I can never tell what is coming next!

 Thank you very much for taking the time and letting us into your mind.

empress_orig
Private commision – Empress

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.

content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

 

 

Small (press) oaks – Simon Moreton

Today we talk to Simon Moreton.

Simon is a mainstay of UK small press zines and comics, having been making for 13 years. I first saw his work championed by the late Tom Spurgeon on his much-missed site Comics Reporter. It was when he started posting images from his recently finished ‘Where?’ series that I started paying greater attention. The sudden shift in style really making his art pop for my eyes.

Simon’s DIY and community led attitude really impressed me as well as his incredible approach in Where? So much so that I feel quite deeply attached to following what he does and why he does it. He was, in fact, the first person I approached about discussing influences as he seems to have a wide sense of taste and be sure about what interests him.

 

You can find him here

Website      Shop      Twitter     Instagram 

where4parts
All four parts of Where?

So, over to Simon!

 

Can you tell us a bit about the first creator whose work you recognised?

I’m going to say either Charles Schulz or Gary Larson in terms of comics. That was because when I was little, we had all these little Peanuts books that I would read again and again, and I loved the Far Side, too. Every year for a long time I’d buy my Dad one of those calendars where you tore off the page each new day for his desk at work. Each page had a cartoon on it, and at the end of the year, Dad would bring them home for me.

In non-comics world, for as long as I can remember I was excited by the visual art that was associated with sci-fi and fantasy games and literature, from 1960s paperbacks to the 70s and 80s album covers. Roger Dean and Rodney Matthews were early faves, but it was probably the Games Workshop artists that I first learned to identify. This was back in the late 1980s.

Games Workshop made – and still make – various tabletop and roleplaying games set in fantasy or futuristic settings, and paintable miniatures to go with them. They publish a monthly magazine called White Dwarf, which back then at least was full of illustrations, mostly black and white, by artists like John Blanche, Ian Miller, John Sibbick, Paul Bonner, and many more. Those were the first artists whose names I knew (and have now forgotten)

 

Which creators do you remember first copying?

Probably one of those Games Workshop ones, I would think.

 

Simon Moreton Ley Lines cover
Simon Moreton Ley Lines due out shortly

Who was the creator that you first thought ‘I’m going to be as good as you!’?

I’ve never thought like this, even as a kid. I’m not competitive at all. There have been artists I admired, but I don’t think I’ve ever thought I’d be ‘as good as’ anyone. Who’d want to be as good as someone else? Not saying it’s easy to see the strength in your own work (and gosh knows I’ve struggled with that) but other people? Nah – I’d rather just make work that’s mine and keep at it.

 

Which creator or creators do you currently find most inspiring?

I can’t provide one, but…. lately I’ve really enjoyed reading Max Porter (‘Lanny’ is A++) there’s a crackle in his prose that really is exciting. In terms of comics, it’s my pals and peers – Warren Craghead, Peony Gent, Maxim Peter Griffin, Brigid Elva and so on – that keep me on my toes.

 

I also saw a painting called Milltown Exit by Fay Jones recently that really kicked me into a different sort of brain loop with my figures and compositional stuff (one of the pages in my forthcoming book for the Ley Lines series is a homage to that painting).

 

Ooo and Bill Traylor, an amazing American painter, and also Rose Wylie. Both of their work is really stunning. Oh and Lynda Barry. ALWAYS Lynda Barry.

 

Which creators do you most often think about?

When I started making comics, John Porcellino was a big influence on me. As time has gone by, I feel my own work has taken its own path and that influence might not be so clear if you were new to my work. But what I do retain is a strong sense of the value of self-publishing, of following your own artistic instinct, of making community through what you do. So even if my influences have been expanding and my own art has drifted to new places, the way I do what I do is thoroughly indebted to John’s early influence on me.

 

Can you name the first three creative peers that come into your head and tell a little bit about why?

I’ve already mentioned a few, so I’ll add Molly Fairhurst, Stan Miller, and Carrie McNinch to that list.

 

 

Finally, can you tell us a bit about your recent work and yourself?

img_6365
Lettuce Bee

I’m a zine maker based in Bristol (b. 1983). I make comics, drawings, and also write prose. My work is largely autobiographical. I make a regular zine called ‘Minor Leagues’ which comprises prose, photos, drawings and comics. I have just finished a memoir about grief, childhood, and the landscape and history of a hill in Shropshire called ‘Where?’. I’ve has been making zines for 13 years.

Forthcoming: ‘The Lie of the Land’ part of the Ley Lines series, published by Kevin Czap and L. Nichols (May/June 2020, COVID-crisis-permitting)

Minor Leagues 10 (self-published May 2020) Out now!!

Where? (Serialised in Minor Leagues 6 – 9)

Lettuce Bee – an anthology of amazing work by amazing people

 

Thank you very much for taking the time to fill this out and let us into your mind.

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.

content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2020

Covid-19 coping round-up

Begin with a digressions then get to the point, that’s my way right?

Digression – you all know that Covid-19 is keeping many people home (and bored) so I thought, why not steal an idea from the great Comic Reporter and do a rolling round up.

 

So here we go  –

online libraries

Solidarity! Revolutionary Center and Radical Library (hosted by University of Kansas)

Comic Book Plus (public domain comic books and strips)

free reads – downloads

Download Judge Dredd Case Files vol.5 for free  – you need to sign up to get it

Colin BellDungeon Fun & Pirate Fun

Colossive PressColossive Records 2019

Dave Cook –   twitter   –   Comic Pack download

David Cooper – twitter    –  Bruce

Phil Elliott –  facebook art page     –    Mammy, Rodney & Wonders of Science   –   Tales from Gimbley (read online)   –    (go here and you can order In His Cups and (w/ Glenn Dakin – Beyond Finity)

Anthony Ez Esmond    –    The Whore Chronicles

Gareth A Hopkins –   twitter – (w/ Eric Blagsvedt) – Found Forest Floor

Nicole Little  –  website   – downloads    – facebook

Chris Mole –   twitter –   Brigantia (w/ Nikki Foxrobot and Melissa Trender)

Ken Reynolds   –  website   –   Cognition   –   Sliced Quarterly   –  My Life as a Cartoon   –   In Trouble

ShortBox   – they have 8 different comics available here  including work from

Emily Carroll    Lucie Bryon    Niv Sekar     Anatola Howard     Nicole Miles     Jean Wei

Sam Wade    and the Pingu Zine by many

Lucy Sullivan –   website   –   Barking download

Brian Talbot  –  website (sidebar has download links)

Artyom Trakhanov – twitter    –   patreon    –    inprint   –   original art     –    shop – free digital copies – you can also purchase here

Andrew White – website     twitter      Downloads –  Yearly 2018   –   Yearly 2019   –  Drowned River Lores

Jim Zub  –   twitter    –   patreon    –    Skullkickers & Wayward downloads

free read – webcomics & online comics and zines

Warren CragheadKids Comics

Diabolik   –   well known and long running Italian comic

Pete Doree –    twitter  –    The Kids From Rec. Road     –    Stan & Jack #1

Hiveworks

LaurenLA HONTE!

Dave NiceMake Your Own Stickers

Tillie Walden – still has On A Sunbeam up online – excellent – you can buy it from Avery Hill, who are also excellent

Tom Woodman  –    twitter    –    Future

go buy

Broken Frontier are running a tag on twitter #brokenfrontierboost to help those who have lost out from closed events

Take a look at Colossive Press – they’re increasing their efforts to raise money for a local hospice

Gareth Brookes – tweet here  –  website    – also see this

 

Delaine Derry Green   –   twitter   – Not My Small Diary

Drawn Chorus Collective  –  shop

Happy Clamshop

Kusshop

Microcosm Publishing – particularly This Zine Has Issues #2

Miller Town – that’s art and zines from Henry and Stan Miller – both great

Olivia Montoyazines and handmade objects

Danny Noblebig cartel

Small Zine Volcano – Not actually buying – free zines for the cost of the postage

Mark Staffordonline shop

Olivia Sullivan  –  shop

Robert Wells – I know he missed out on a kickstarter, so think about buying something from his big cartel– he’s lovely and talented

Amy Wike – supporting US artists by selling prints of people hugging – A Hug or Something Like It

Shannon Wrightshop (digital comics for $1 and a free zine)

virtual cons and activities

Zara Slattery   –   twitter   –  has a couple of mask to print ans colour in

Don’t Hide PR are offering a boost to small press creators – press release list

open calls

kus! s! – announcement – closes 13 May 2020

twitter

Already happened but still viewable is #kitchenconnights the most recent version of #kitchencon     ** UPDATE** Another one is planned for  19th April

facebook

Geek Asylum Virtual Con (26th April)

Stay Home Comic Con (28th-29th March)   –  Already happened, but still loads of resources and details available

Xerox Days

 

 

go look – Amelia White

I came across Amelia White’s art by complete accident – she has a name similar to another account I follow, but a style very different to that one. I liked her approach to texture in her paintings and her silly come absurdist sense of humour.

Fun things are good in hard times!

(click on images to follow links)

Meelz Art - website
website

 

Meelz Art - etsy
etsy

Meelz Art - red bubble
red bubble

 

Meelz Art - twitter
twitter

 

Meelz Art - instagram
instagram

 

Meelz Art - facebook
facebook