The Short List – Zeno Carta

Disclosure – I am currently working with Zeno Carta on an anthology planned to release in June.

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ZL – Your work is, so far, all black and white linework, would you like to see your work coloured?

ZC – I’ve been focusing for now on the rhythm of black and white because, while colour can do a lot, it can also easily overwhelm. Black and white is all most comics need to do their work, and I find that, when done well, black and white is actually clearer and more appealing. It’s hard to match good black and white design for pure impact.

That said, my most recent comic as of writing, “Warehouse (nsfw)” uses limited colour to do what black and white can’t.

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C-Series – Rev.0.978 – Warehouse – detail – page 10

I think that many comics treat colour almost like an afterthought, but colour has its own rhythms to consider–otherwise you lose the focus that black and white line art often has on its own. At the very least you need to know the colour wheel and basic pleasing palettes like dual and split complimentary.

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

ZC – No idea when I first liked something, but the comics I read as a kid were mostly Tintin and Peanuts. I pretty much believe that Herge and Schulz can teach you most of what you need to know about comics, before learning on your own. Learning comics is mostly practice–more of a craft than book-learning–but Tintin and Peanuts make a pretty good foundation.

Going back to those comics now, I think you can still see a sort of spark that explains why everyone knows them. I mean, it’s no fluke that they’re still popular, while the vast majority of comics never make it out of the basement. They have something to say, but know how to say it in a way that feels like a real experience.

ZL – Given an unlimited budget and all the time in the world what would you create and where or how would you send it into the world?

ZC – Given unlimited time and resources and time, I’m sure I would start a whole bunch of crazy projects and never finish any of them. There’s far more creativity in restriction and discipline than there is in unlimited resources.

Restriction, both in time and money (and even in skill) forces you to think of new ways of doing things. If you’ve got to draw a page that’s supposed to be an intricate city scene but you’ve only got a few hours left, you’re going to have to figure out some different way of doing things that might actually end up being better from a design or story perspective, while still taking less time. In other words, restriction forces you to experiment.

This isn’t an excuse for laziness in comics, but rather what I mean is that, when given unlimited freedom, there’s nothing to spur you to change bad habits and discover new ways of doing things. (This the is the reason I tend to stick to a grid. I’ve got to box myself in or else I lose all sense.)

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MKVI-3 – Default Mode – page 4

ZL – I’m new to your work but have dug through your website and really love what I see. How long have you been drawing comics and what was the impetus to start putting them online?

ZC – I made comics as a kid but only came back recently. Right now I’m just sort of seeing what people might be interested in.

Or in more modern terms: In order to reach #success you must #motivate and #extricate your thoughts #fromdepressiontoinvention to #testthemarket and #findyourself today in this web of internet tubes that create a mirror on our life and demand our attention at every moment but take us even farther from the nature which would make us #happy, which is why you could do with a monthly #successquotes postcard (from my Patreon) with a custom sketch to help you out of the trap.

ZL – What is the most important influence on your current work?

ZC – Impossible to pick one. Some prominent influences recently would include 40s noir films, Mike Mignola, W.T. Frick, and vaporwave. There are ideas everywhere if you’re a curious sort.

I really liked those “influence maps” from a few years ago (basically ancient in internet time) because they revealed how far away influences can be even for people who have stuck with a similar style their whole career.

Or in other words, once when I was a teenager I was out in an old flat-bottomed aluminum boat. The water was really low that year, and a shoal that had never been a problem before suddenly looked way too close to the surface. I was still running fine, but instead of skimming the surface I decided to slow down. The boat lowered just enough that the propeller crunched where it shouldn’t, which snapped the shearing pins. And being the idiot I was at 15, I hadn’t replaced the spare shearing pins after tangling with some lily pads in a marsh the previous fall. I had to prop the motor and paddle a mile home, meaning that when I got there I had to eat moose instead of venison.

The Short List – Gareth Hopkins (@grthink)

Disclosure – I have worked with Gareth on a contributor’s copy only zine before and am currently working with him on an anthology planned to release in June.

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Petrichor         preview it      buy it        listen to Gareth talk about it

 

ZL –  I believe you started out drawing for fashion zines before moving on to drawing comic zines. Why the move to comic zines?

GH – I wasn’t doing fashion zines, but rather fashion illustration for Amelia’s Magazine. I’d already started working on The Intercorstal – I’d done 30 or so pages, I think? – but was looking for new challenges, and Amelia’s Magazine was a great place to do fashion and editorial illustrations. There’d be a call out from either Amelia herself or one of the writers, and you’d either get some reference or a list of things to Google, then given a day or so to come up with an image. It was a challenge at the time because I was always trying to do comicsy art, which sometimes worked really well (like when I did some illustrations of Tony & Guy which were very heavily trying to be Indigo Prime)

Toni-Guy-SS12-tall2-by-Gareth-A-Hopkins
Toni & Guy illustration by Gareth for Amelia’s Magazine

but sometimes went against the grain of what the magazine’s aesthetic. Not a lot directly came out of working with Amelia’s (some people were able to make the jump to commercial illustration jobs), but I got some hard lessons in prepping artwork for print (I was in the Compendium Of Fashion Illustration, but had never used CMYK before), made some great friends, and got really comfortable with working quickly.

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

GH – I don’t really remember it but… there’s one panel from Revere, (by John Smith and Simon Harrison, appeared in 2000AD in the 90s) that sat in the back of my brain for years and years. It was the silhouette of a hand against the static of a TV, and the main character was trying to do some kind of magic spell using the static as a portal.

revere written in water crop
Revere Written by John Smith Art by Simon Harrison Published in 2000AD

In my brain it took up half a page, but when I re-read the comic 20-odd years later it was a tiny, incidental panel. There was just something about it that my brain glommed onto.

 

ZL – Given an unlimited budget and all the time in the world, what would be the project you’d make to be remembered by?

GH – So much of my work is the result of constraints – time, space, materials – that I don’t know what I’d do with unlimited resources. I’d definitely go large, make some kind of immersive environment, like MeowWolf, and I’d also like to make it collaborative somehow… but I don’t know if it would be memorable? Also… in general I think ‘Complete Creative Freedom’ makes people lazy. I can’t think of any situation where someone was given complete creative freedom where their art was better than when there were limits imposed — limits of budget, or content, or scale. Really good art, as far as I can tell (and I stand to be corrected) is always pushing against something.

 

ZL – You have quite a long history in the small press/ zine scene now, with a history of style shifts as well. Is there a style you’ve left behind that you feel revisiting would reap interesting rewards?

GH – Well, I’d sort of left behind the old ‘Intercorstal style’, which was very tight and careful, during ‘Found Forest Floor‘ which was very impulsive and loose, but made an intentional return to it when I worked on The Intercorstal: Extension. For anyone unfamiliar with how I made it, I’d done a project called ‘The Intercorstal 2’ 

which involved abstracting existing comics (by other artists that I liked) and also doing my own pages to the same format and dimensions. I’d been selling the results of that as a zine, but one time when I printed it out got the settings wrong and instead printed each A5 page in the middle of an A4 sheet. I didn’t want to waste the paper, so I decided to carry on the pages by filling out the space to either side of that, literally having to re-learn the styles and techniques I’d been using previously. There are some styles I can’t return to though… ‘Too Dry To Rot’ was originally intended as a return to the first Intercorstal pages that I’d done, but has since become a total rejection of them.

 

ZL – You have a graphic novel, Petrichor, out with Good Comics.  What image from this work would you choose to have tattooed on your back?

GH -I don’t know if there are any images from it that are defined enough to become tattoos. They’re so abstract that they’re more… audio than visual? Like, they give a sense of feeling, rather than being something identifiable to ‘read’ (which isn’t the same for many of my other comics, I should point out, where I’ve carefully constructed the images to work visually).

Petrichor page
Petrichor page

 

 

If I was going to get anything from Petrichor tattooed it’d be one of the repeating phrases, of which there’s a few to choose from. If it was to be tattooed somewhere where I’d see it, like on a forearm, I might go with ‘Vent Axia’…. but if it’s on my back it’s more for other people’s benefit, so I’d go with ‘It’s Easy To Forget How Many Times You’ve Fallen In Love’.

 

 

 

 

Intercorstal: Extension Review

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

The Short List – mir.and.or

Disclosure – I should let you all know that I have worked with mir.and.or on a contributor copy only zine and am currently working with mir.and.or on a project currently slated to publish in June.

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ZL – Why and when did you start making comics?

M – I have always wanted to make comics from a young age, originally just because of the aesthetic of traditional comics, the colours and line-art which I always loved. I also always found comics a very impressive art form as well, one that took a lot of time, effort and skill but wasn’t as self-indulgent as other illustrative professions. However I never actually made any sequential pieces until my third year of uni, before then I think I was a little scared that I might ruin the thing I admired the most, if I wasn’t good enough.

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

M – In terms of comics I guess the one that stands out the most for me was Victor Moscoso’s super psychy comics from Zap. When I was 15 or so I used to be obsessed with psychedelic rock posters and I think someone at some point told me he did comics as Victor Moscosowell and I was just mind blown because I didn’t know comics like that even existed. But it definitely just felt a lot more natural to me than the narrative based comics I had been reading.

 

ZL – Given an unlimited budget and all the time in the world, what would be the project you’d make to be remembered by?

M – I think I’d really like to do a collaborative audio-visual comic with a band or musician which visualises a full album. I’d love to just do something really experimental with sound and perhaps even try out some kind of live events/exhibitions.

Hurricane page 1

ZL – You’ve featured in a number of anthologies that I know of, including Heavy Metal, do you have plans for any long form work??

M – There are quite a few stories I want to tell from my childhood which could translate into a series, but I think at this point I am still looking for the right way to visualise them. I don’t think I could really be happy with illustrating them in any traditional or representational way. I am working on finding an angle that allows me to show a really emotional side of being stuck in your own head as a kid and is less bothered by the events or characters in the stories.

Briz de Mar Page 7

 

ZL – What is the most important influence on your current work?

M – I’m usually influenced by a lot of different types of things, not necessarily comics or art. At the moment I really just like looking at textures, in particular within fashion. Just finding interesting fabrics and surfaces and looking at how they move. Then kind of thinking about what kind of feeling or emotion that texture has and from that I find a story. Which I guess is what designing for fashion is all about, although I don’t know too much about it.

 

 

Previous interview – The Short List – Shuffleplay comics

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.

content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019