Warglitter Review

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Warglitter Issue 1

 

I believe in coincidence.

I know as fact that things just happen BECAUSE. Because being my personal truth, (personal truth – the little white lies that cover the cracks). BECAUSE meaning the millions of things that are always happening that you know nothing about, refuse to acknowledge, don’t want to talk about, aren’t interested in as they’re just not important enough to waste life time on, etc.

BECAUSE being like this – Did you know microwaves were first created in the late 40’s? Not really popular until the 80’s BECAUSE. You could list cost, acceptability, blah, blah, blah. It’s just easier to accept that it was BECAUSE and get on with life. Is that the same attitude you want to take towards your future, your relationships?

Because is a default for the shoulder shrug, the pulled face, the ‘a butterfly’s wing flapping…’, the defeatist ‘oh who can be bothered’. I say or think BECAUSE as it’s so hard to face the thing I’m becausing about. The question is, is that how to live a good life (by which I mean attain contentment), (Happiness and the search for it, is a GRAIL quest, the modern search for eternal life).

Getting back to track. BECAUSE, then, is the enemy of a reviewer really. It is too often treated as a friend though. I guess that comes down to space and TL:DR. Too often a reviewer states that you’ll like a thing, rather than discussing what it does and why that should matter. It’s the gatekeeper mentality – I’m cool and I’ll tell you what’s cool, not argue why it’s worth your time.

It’s what I’ve been fighting with when thinking of a review for Warglitter. My urge is to say – get it BECAUSE it’s AWESOME, (another catchall for – too big to tell you).

I mean; it’s true, but it’s not honest. Yes, the two can be exclusive. Honesty requires the commitment to fullness, truth requires you don’t lie. I am not believer in truth, personal or universal, in case it wasn’t clear from the above. I’m going to be honest and say, I believe any search for TRUTH is the opportunity to avoid personal honesty and responsibility.

Warglitter Zines

 

Now, you’ll be thinking, why are you telling me all this? (I like the sound of my own thoughts?) Well, because Warglitter – the person, not the zine – has crafted an amazing work where she’s starting to be honest with herself and maybe leaving the search for Truth behind. She may not even know it…

My evidence? Well, Warglitter lays out her purpose up front. She writes about why she writes a journal and tells us what commitments she made. She gives me all my clues right up front and right out clear.

These things are telling, to me at least.

  1. write down beliefs and personal truths – having beliefs and personal truths next to each other sounds like someone being honest and then hiding a truth they don’t want to witness, saying ‘they’re not beliefs, they’re personal truths…’

A new addition to the list

  1. dismantle your defence mechanism persona –having to go back and qualify and talk about personal psychology, about defences, seems a change in understanding. Time has given a gift of new understanding. Like 5 is the knee jerk reaction and then 8 is the slow dawning realisation of the Honest facts.

If that is the case, then these

  1. keep up a regular tarot practice and dig deep
  2. creating my next niche
  3. work through depression and learn from it

are the pendulum swinging between how to be Honest and how to hide from it.

  1. decorate this journal – make it a sacred object –says it all, fetishise that Truth. Then again, those later additions take it back down to earth – back to magic, down to earth. Pendulum swinging, swinging.

Being honest – why is this amazing?

There are so many echoes of what matters to me right now, what I’ve struggled with.

For me, this is a timely piece of work to appear before me.

It’s not what I’d do to deal with these subjects.

Likewise, Warglitter does things and holds belief that I have no personal commitment or interest in. Yet, here she is talking about things I’ve spent years struggling with, talking about things I’ve finally been able to think honestly about. Saying them in ways and contexts very different to mine and so making them clearer for me to see.

If you asked to label it, it’s a perzine verfremdung effect – I love Brecht’s idea that to make something more obvious, you should first make it appear strange.

It’s what I’m always hoping to achieve, but here made simple where I would hide it in layers of pomp.

That’s what I like about this, it’s like looking at my life but as I’ve never lived or experienced it, so I don’t have to hide from the truth it reveals.

What I take from this may not be what is meant by this and may not be what you get from this, but it is why I think this is an amazing piece of work.

I see that there is no solution to who you are, or what you’re feeling – there’s only being honest with yourself and dealing with those facts rather than just excusing yourself with BECAUSE, (because no one ever loved me, I’ll be unlovable… because I keep getting hurt, I’ll push everyone away – they’re all TRUE and you’ll never solve that TRUTH, you just have to be honest, face it and deal with it every day, but by facing it and putting it out there each day it might just get easier to be that better person, get that step closer to contentment and kindness.

This is a brave work and a hard path and deserves your attention because of the reward you may get from it.

The Short List – Warglitter Zines Interview

Previous Review: Intercorstal: Extension Review

all art copyright and trademark it's respective owners. 
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

The Short List – Warglitter Zines

Warglitter Zines is our first responder in this twice weekly series.

We ask 5 questions aiming to understand the creator’s practice, aspirations and inspirations

Warglitter on youtube                    Warglitter Zines                      Order Warglitter’s Zine

ZL – You run a zine making group, how does that influence what you make and what made you want to start it in the first place?

WZ – I started a zine making club at the school where I teach. We had a rough year last spring and a coworker suggested I start a club. He said, on the hard days, he was always able to look forward to the club he runs because it was his time for sharing his passion with students who are actually interested. Late in the spring semester, it occurred to me that I should start a zine club. I talked it up in my classes and students are starting to learn about it by word of mouth. It’s pretty cool.

It does affect the kinds of stuff I put out there. I made the Carly Rae Jepsen Fanzine because I wanted to have an example I could show my students of different things you could try in a zine. I made the quiz and the mad libs because I remember seeing that kind of thing in teen magazines and enjoying them when I was growing up.

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I wrote Guilt because that was a story from my own life that I always wanted to tell and I thought my students could relate to it. Usually, my fiction comes out very sinister and I didn’t want to share any of those stories or my poetry with them. Because I started the zine club, I chose to follow some ideas that I wouldn’t have usually. I thought I needed something wholesome to show them, so I made the opposite of what I’m usually inspired to make, and I really loved the process and the final results.

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

WZ – One of my earliest memories is of the music video for ‘Take On Me’ by a-ha.  I was probably 3 or 4 years old and I was just transfixed by it. I didn’t see that video again until late at night in the mid-90’s. I think they actually showed it on Liquid Television, late night animation programming on MTV. There was no way I could have, but I felt like I had instinctively understood how that video was made as a toddler. Something about the live action world intersecting with the comic book world made sense to me. That moment when he reaches out of the comic book and the girl in the diner takes his hand is still just electrifying for me.

I really love music videos and actually use them in the classroom. There’s just something about that marriage of music and images that cuts me to my core. I can feel it in my solar plexus. A lot of music videos make me cry.

 

ZL – Given an unlimited budget and all the time in the world, what would be the project you’d make to be remembered by?

WZ – I don’t know, probably a one-night-only performance art event with some kind of giant multimedia collage and an interpretive dance routine going on simultaneously. And a lot of glitter. Barbra Streisand would stand next to it and she’d have to pretend to be very nice to people all night.

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Jens Lekman portriat by Warglitter

ZL – You’ve included a couple of drawings in the zines you have made and they’ve all been awesome, why don’t your zines include more art from you?

WZ – I think the Carly zine might be the only one I’ve made that doesn’t have something I drew in it, and that’s because I was really going for a more classic collage aesthetic but like the squeaky-clean version of that.

I doodle a lot, but I’ve never really had a good drawing practice. I kind of go through phases. Every once in a while, I tell myself I’m going to practice drawing every day and get REALLY good at it, but it never lasts long. I’ve always had a lot of different hobbies and creative outlets, but I’ve never really been aces at any one thing.

 

ZL – I know you talked a little about this on your initial Warglitter videos on YouTube, but some people may not have seen those, so, what made you want to do video reviews of zines?

WZ – I wanted to start a YouTube channel, but I never knew what to talk about. I felt like if I didn’t have something to offer people, no one would watch. Near the end of last summer, I started searching YouTube for channels devoted to talking about zines and I was really surprised at how few there were. And the zine videos with the most views weren’t even made by people with channels devoted to zines. I thought, ‘here are a few people who really care about something I’m interested in, and there aren’t so many people already talking about this that I would have to worry about getting views or filling my channel with content. We could just be a little community of people who are in it for love rather than money or notoriety.’ So the most obvious way for me to start, it seemed, was to review zines I was buying or getting from people through trades.

 

all art copyright and trademark it's respective owners. 
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019