go look – Fanzine Ynfytyn

fanzine ynfyntyn - insert
issue 10 – out of print

I’m not really sure how I stumbled across Fanzine Ynfytyn (from Emma Falconer), but I’ve looked over Emma’s site and picked through the previews of her zines and enjoyed her perzine work a lot.

She seems tohave lived a fun and interesting life and she tells her stories in a friendly , engaging voice.

(click on images to follow links)

 

fanzine ynfyntyn - shop
shop

 

 

fanzine ynfyntyn - website
website – a note on a rainy night

 

 

fanzine ynfyntyn - other website website
website – emma falconer

 

 

fanzine ynfyntyn - instagram
instagram

 

 

fanzine ynfyntyn - facebook
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fanzine ynfyntyn - flickr
flikr

 

 

Go view – 16 pages press

Publisher of the great Kermesse – in which I have appeared a number of times

16 Pages Press regularly distribute Kermesse for free and feature the work of artists, photographers and poets

It’s a true DIY zine scene collaboration

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Go Fund – Sarah Millman

npc tea a fantasy comic set in modern day cardiff this scene feature the summoning of a demon via a magic portal

Campaign finishing Friday, February 28 2020 7:00 PM UTC +00:00.

Welsh seems to be a theme in my kickstarter recommendations, can’t think why…
Anyway, this has some really clean cartooning that communicates character and emotion really well. Also demons, elves, coffee shops and Cardiff – there’s a good brew to sit down with whilst you contemplate the modern world passing you by.
Oh – and it’s mostly a collection of existing stuff, so you know it will be produced.

(click on images to follow links)

http://kck.st/38XMkxy

Also – check out their accounts

 

twiiter header for sarah millman aka milmo aka heart_of_time featuring art from npc tea a fantasy comic set in modern day cardiff this scene feature the summoning of a demon via a magic portal
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instagram feed of sarah millman creator of npc tea a fantasy comic set in modern day cardiff
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facebook header for sarah millman comics and illustration creator of npc tea a fantasy comic set in modern day cardiff
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Go Fund – Sam Mendez – Hand Signals vol.1 – Arwyddion Llaw

Campaign finishing Wednesday, February 12 2020 3:13 PM UTC +00:00

Going to be honest and say the Welsh caught my eye, then I lingered for the art

Love the drawing, the line weight and shapes and colours

(click on images to follow links)

http://kck.st/2t3QvZ8

Also – check out their accounts

instagram account for sam mendez featuring watercolour drawings, lifestyle photos and the zine
instagram

 

sam mendez twitter account floating chair
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Go look – Mattias Gunnarsson

Zine produced by mattias gunnarsson featuring designs in ink inspired by his ongoing mash works

Mattias makes environmental art and the most incredible sketch zines and records of events. If you love art or drawing you want to swap with him – trust me!

(click on image for site)

Masu project featuring multicoloured beams used to form landscape artwebsite

Matias gunnarsson Instagram feed with a mix of his environmental sculptures and zines and the work of others

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Paper Underground Awards – Originally, I said that this would be – Best discovery I made in November (but it was really just being sarcastic) Then I received something in October that fitted the bill.

pannonica issue one a printed and hand stapled zine made by nick prolix with abstract images and thopughts structured into a coherent narrative

Originally, I said that this would be – Best discovery I made in November (but it was really just being sar

Originally, I said that this would be – Best discovery I made in November (but it was really just being sarcastic) Then I received something in October that fitted the bill.

Which is an odd title for an award, but there we go.

Download from here

Pages from Pannonica issue one by nick prolix featuring abstract black images on creamy coloured paper
Pages from Pannonica issue 1

The winner is Nick Prolix with his Pannonica series (and experience)

Originally, I included this as a dig at all those bests of lists that come out in December thereby blowing off everything that comes out in December.

Then in October and again In November I read part of an ongoing series that struck me as amazing and original, but also as something that concretised a feeling I’d had for a while about UK comics and zines and where I’m seeing work that I would consider vital and important.

Petrichor, our initial award winner, is part of that wave. A wave that drives its visuals with non-representational art married to real life thoughts and emotions. It has narrative, but not story. Structure but not linearity.

Sort of a comic slipstream fiction, but nothing like it.

Anyway

Why name it?

Pannonica was something very surprising to me, considering Nick’s normal mode of comics are very representational and timebound. Here’s this printed and hand made zine with abstract images.  A zine related to tweets and Instagram posts. World building by building in the world rather than the fictional page. Yet, amazingly, it’s a work that still manages to be structured, human and about matters of life. Dealing with the humanity of his thoughts, his present concerns, his art history and art future. Not necessarily universal, but personally meaningful to me and timely – like it froze a wave and made a statue for generations to come to look upon.

What’s striking about Pannonica is how it creates narrative structure in the same manner as Nick’s story work, with call backs, shadowing plot points and running a theme through its paces.

iestyn

 

Go look – Oliver East

oliver east comic books strange ways and prime time rolling stock lanky homesick truant's cumbrian yarn take me back to manchester comic page previews

this is the first post of Oliver East's work I ever shared 6 1/2 half years ago. it's a beautiful rendition of space and experience. rolling stock 186 4 october 2013
Rolling Stock 186 4 October 2013

this is the first post of Oliver East’s work I ever shared 6 1/2 half years ago. it’s a beautiful rendition of space and experience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oliver East Rolling Stock 1 I own this comic zine It's a beautiful evocation of space Oliver East has been a hug influence upon my work
I own this comic zine It’s a beautiful evocation of space Oliver East has been a hug influence upon my work

 

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The Short List – Tom Murphy, some of Colossive Press

Disclosure – Colossive Press published a zine by me and I have published two contributor only zines with one of the Colossive Press people.

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ZL – You’ve published a number of zines now, through Colossive Press, have you any plans for new publications?

CP – Oh yes! Putting out the first few things through CP last year was a bit like opening the floodgates to ten or fifteen years’ worth of ideas that I’d not had the opportunity or confidence to pursue. They’re all at a fairly nebulous stage, so I need to focus on one at a time and get it done – it’s easy to get a bit paralysed and not know which way to go first.

Ahead of the Sheffield Zine Fair on May 18th, Jane (my wife) has compiled Things My Dad Saw (But Never Bothered Mentioning) – a book of intriguing photos by her dad, Gordon Gibbens, who was also the subject of How Graffiti Saved My Dad’s Life (At Least for a While). As well as his street art photography, Gordon used to hunt down press launches, demonstrations, festivals, marches, etc. As a result, there’s a lot of splendid and strange shots in his archive.

Things Dad Saw cover 1200
Things My Dad Saw

We’re also launching 3:52 AM, an A6 zine of words and photography by our brilliant friend VJ Sellar, based on her experience of insomnia (and raising money for the Maggie’s Wallace centre in Cambridge). I like to think we’ve coaxed her into the world of zines, and hopefully there are more to come.

Given the time I’d also like to publish more things by other people, as a bit of a patron. I’d like Colossive to be a bit like Ghost Box or some of the small music labels I follow on Bandcamp, finding interesting work with a strong identity and bringing it to the world.

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

Odyssey 7
Odyssey 7 Manchester

CP – At my age, most of my “firsts” are lost in the mists of time. However, I’d say that the first work in the print medium that really blew my mind was Bryan Talbot’s Luther Arkwright. As a teenager I was a casual and slightly ironic reader of whatever comics I could find in the newsagents of Chorley. However, when I landed a plum part-time job at Morrisons (in 1985), my horizons soon spread to Odyssey 7 in Manchester, where the world of comics opened up in front of me like a thousand-leaved lotus blossom. And one of the first goodies I picked up was book one of Arkwright.

Even though I was also getting into series like Swamp Thing, American Flagg! and Moonshadow, Arkwright totally captivated me with the intricacy of the narrative and the incredible craft of its execution. When, after a seemingly interminable hiatus, the second and third volumes dropped, Talbot’s mastery of the medium just seemed to expand exponentially.

Page from Luther Arkwright
Page from Luther Arkwright

As much as anything, the whole work implanted the idea that at their best, whether dealing with the mundane or the cosmic, comics could do stuff that other mediums couldn’t even dream of. That notion has kept me coming back, through thick and thin, for 30-odd years.

 

ZL – Given an unlimited budget and all the time in the world, what would be the project you’d make to be remembered by?

CP – Ha – I’d have no idea what to do with a budget! I guess a full-blown Croydon Spaceport visitor experience somewhere in the town’s now legendary Whitgift Centre, complete with historical artefacts, audio-visual displays and – naturally – a lavishly furnished gift shop.

Ad Astra cover 1200
Ad Astra

ZL – Ad Astra is an alternative history story, what was the initial trigger for that idea?

CP – Oh blimey… I think that somewhere along the line, during a period of creative paralysis, I had an idea for a series of one-page text-and-image concoctions under the overall title Going Somewhere, Going Nowhere, based on the idea of travel and journeys. Little one-shots I could aim to wrap up quickly.

One of the notions I had was a voice remembering when the 119 bus used to go as far as Croydon Spaceport, how it used to be packed with people going to see the launches etc. I think that came about from the heritage work being done at the site of Croydon Airport – the very first London airport – and the sort of faded sci-fi, “lost future” feel that some of the town gives off.

Anyway, one of the benefits of my characteristic procrastination is that the idea had time to germinate in my noddle into something a bit richer. I started to come up with a more detailed timeline and cast list for the short and ultimately disappointing history of Croydon’s municipal space programme.

Another influence was a bit of street art that thousands of people walk past every day without even noticing. Underneath Blackfriars Bridge in London, the pedestrian underpass is decorated with tile displays showing alternative plans for the bridge, scenes from its construction etc. However, some enterprising ‘guerilla historian’ has dug out the Letraset and staged a bit of an intervention to come up with an alternative history involving flat-pack bridges from Argos and lost instruction manuals. I loved the element of absolute toot being delivered in a very straight-faced way.

The final piece of the jigsaw was the discovery of Flickr Commons, where various institutions make their image archives available with no copyright restrictions. With NASA and the San Diego Air and Space Museum among the participating institutions, I soon found plenty of images that lent themselves to gags or unlikely developments. Once I’d cracked the format, it kind of wrote itself.

 

ZL – You’ve had a lot of success and good feedback from ‘How Graffiti Saved My Dad’s Life…’ As that’s such a personal book, what does that feel like and mean to you?

CP – We’ve both been blown away by the response to the book – and we’re very proud on Gordon’s behalf. The initial aim was to showcase some of his photographs and the brilliant work of the street artists he admired. But Gordon was such an amazing man that Jane just had to tell his story.

Gordon was effectively written off when he received his second terminal cancer diagnosis in July 2016. but within weeks he was out with his camera again. Although he was clearly very frail, nobody on the graffiti scene really knew how ill Gordon was or what he was going through. Many of them have only found out recently through the book – something we now regret in a way.

There’s been a massive wave of affection and admiration for Gordon from all over the world, both from those who knew him and from complete strangers. We always knew what a brilliant person he was, of course, but it’s been great to spread the word. And although she’ll kill me for saying this, I’m pleased that more people now appreciate what Jane went through and what an amazing support she was for her dad.

All profits from the book are going to St Christopher’s hospice in Sydenham (south-east London), from where Gordon set off on some of his final graffiti trips. With a little help from our friends – including Steve from London Calling Blog, who organised a charity street art walk in Penge – we’ve now raised more than £1,300, and we hope that figure will continue to rise. (We’ll also be donating the profits from Things My Dad Saw…)

We’re very pleased and proud to be able to support such a worthy cause in return for all the help St Christopher’s has given our family. Jane’s mum Pat was also cared for there, and following Gordon’s death, Jane received bereavement counselling through the hospice. Its work is absolutely vital to the local community, but it remains alarmingly underfunded.

Ultimately, the message of the book is: find something you love doing then find a way to carry on doing it. That’s one of the driving impulses behind DIY culture, and it’s what we’re both trying to do with Colossive.

 

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.

content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

The Short List – Simon Russell

 

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review of Njord & Skadi

 

ZL – What made you choose folk tales for your series?

SR – Art is many things at the same time for audiences and artists, but one of the most important to me in this phase of my life is the idea that Art is Play – making or appreciating anything provokes an emotional response and in a world of hard noses and cold shoulders, the emotion I am most keen on pulling to the surface is delight.

Every time I set out to make comics, I was finding that I’d box myself in by insisting that the piece must be Original or Important or Worthwhile.

I think that was a valid reaction to seeing a lot of work that is very well executed but … why does it exist?

So much stuff consumed, with no change in my world and no desire to reread it left me muttering ‘that was well done, but why did you bother? And why should I care?’

But I was letting other people’s work dictate how I approached my own and that lead to me taking everything too seriously

I didn’t have that problem with my paintings or drawings – I was embracing accidents and chance and letting images grow from the different ways I could play with the media.

boing creations
Simon’s output

It seemed that retelling existing stories could be a way of getting past myself, so I wouldn’t obsess over the ‘value’ of a project and could enjoy the Play. Folk tales, myths and legends have been a recurring choice for me as a consumer over the years and I like the way that the same story can be told in ways that differ slightly or wildly. It’s like music in that respect.

So, I reasoned that if I work (sometimes) under the banner of Once Upon Again… I would never run out of material or challenges and wouldn’t hit a what-to-do block when snatching odd hours for work, as I often have to.

I may never have tested the idea if it hadn’t been for a chance meeting with Jon Mason, the Storyteller who became a collaborator. We both had a love of Norse myths and the Marriage of Njord & Skadi turned out to be one we’d each been tinkering with independently – so it was a quick decision to work together on the new comic, focusing on ‘the giantess who came for revenge, but chose a husband… and then chose again.’

That makes Once Upon Again number 1, and number 2 is a 2-page comic I did of Loki & Coyote Talking By A Tree, but OUA 3 will probably be my more comical retelling of the Njord & Skadi tale – old stories being told and retold in different ways really appeals to the part of me that wants to use more than one approach and my interest/obsession with formalistic aspects of the comic form.

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

SR – The first time? That was probably a Goofy t-shirt I had around age 5. I probably wore it for a while, but what I remember is tracing the image over and over and over and then drawing the cartoon character without tracing because I’d worked out the ellipses he was made from. And then drawing other figures. It may not be a true or accurate memory given how early it was, but I treasure it as the spark that lit a fire in me for drawing.

The first identifiable pieces of art I can remember loving were Tove Jansonn’s pictures with pen and word in Finn Family Moomintroll; Starry Night by Van Gogh (on a biscuit tin or a place mat at somebody’s house, I think); and the drawings of Jack Kirby/Steve Ditko in Mighty World of Marvel number 1 (and the t-shirt transfer that came with it! for somebody who never got in to self-expression through fashion, pictures on clothes seem to have loomed large in my formative years)

 

ZL – Given an unlimited budget and all the time in the world, what would be the project you’d make to be remembered by?

SR – I’d like to publish a line of superior comic works by other artists – funded to create their best work over a proper time frame; edited and mentored and stretched to make each piece a substantial and lasting work; promoted and distributed to an audience that is taught to appreciate comics as more than stories or visuals

 

Tales of the Norse Gods & Heroes by BL Picard

 

ZL – What single creation would you settle down with and just chill?

SR – I watched Star Wars hundreds of times growing up so that film is definitely a relaxing comforter. I would read the works of Tove Jansson or the Tales of the Norse Gods & Heroes by BL Picard in books and Krazy Kat or Calvin & Hobbes in comics. Maybe listen to Colours by Ken Nordine (Spotify)or something

 

 

ZL – You have a new comic, NORSE COMIC: (Once Upon Again) The Marriage of Njord & Skadi, out soon.  What image from this work would you choose to have pasted all around town? Skadi cover image

SR – I guess I’d use the cover image for Njord & Skadi, because it shows her as the one with more gravitas and it’s obviously a ‘love story’ but it’s not a romance comic or a norse battle. Plus it shows the sort of drawing inside as well as anything can when so much of the art was made though deliberately accidental mark-making

Thanks for asking!

The Short List – zines.need.you

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ZL – What is your history with zines and how did that lead to zines.need.you?

 

ZNY – I began writing zines as a teenager – as a kid I’d make my own little magazines but didn’t realise that zines existed until I was about 16 and got into mailart through the internet. I made 20 copies of my first zine on a photocopier in a newsagent in 2001 and gave it to my friends. I’ve been making them intermittently ever since – zine fests help foster a community of zinesters, and more recently Instagram is good for seeings what’s out there. I’m not particularly prolific in terms of making zines but I think about them a lot and love them as a way of sharing experiences and ideas. Zines Need You is a new project that came out of thinking quite hard about who doesn’t get heard in the zine scene and how that can be changed. I’ve been involved in DIY scenes for 15 years and wanted to use that familiarity to open the door a little wider. I’m a middle class white punk and zine fests often feature alot of people like me – it can be a little too comfortable and I would like that to change. ZNY seems like a low key place to start – its a small project to help get zines into print that might not otherwise be published. We’re keen to do a good job with a small project rather than promising the world and half-arsing it – we’ve committed to printing a zine a month for 2019 then by the end of the year we should have some idea of whether its sustainable to continue.

 

 

ZL – What sort of process do you use to decide on recipients for the zines.need.you monthly publishing deal?

Helen Dearnley @helendearnleyillustration
Helen Dearnley – second zine published under the scheme

ZNY – There isn’t much of a process so far as it’s early days, and certainly no standard criteria for inclusivity. We are keen to avoid people feeling like they have to list all their points of marginalisation in order to get our attention so we’re largely trusting them to decide for themselves whether they need our help or not. We also don’t want people to feel like we’ll only print things they’ve written that focus on their experiences of oppression because we want them to be as free as anyone else to write about whatever they like. Some of my favourite zines are hilariously frivolous and making those shouldn’t be a luxury, you know? I think there’s a danger that those financially supporting projects can end up expecting to have influence over what is created, so in this project we’re trying to be mindful of that dynamic and so far staying out of people’s creative process as much as possible. That said it’s been really cool to get lots of queries about different parts of zine making and nice to be able to share knowledge about printing, cut and paste, mini zines, zine fests and so on.

We are bringing our experiences and knowledge of anti-oppressive practice to this project so there is a core ethos to who we are interested in hearing from. We’re keen for this project to show solidarity with communities of colour, disabled creators, neurodivergent folks, working class makers and so on, and especially the people who live in the overlap of those identities. There have always been rad zines being made by these folks but there are more that haven’t been printed for lack of funds and encouragement and that’s where ZNY hopes to offer a signal boost.

 

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

 

ZNY – The first zines I came across were ones that I got in the mail as part of art swaps coordinated online. The first few I got came from Australia and America and turned up in these wild envelopes covered in stickers or made out of x-rays. They absolutely blew my mind – looking back now the content wasn’t anything exceptional but the realisation that you could just crack on and make a zine and that there were other people out there who would read them was huge. Like I mentioned before I had been making these little homemade magazines since I was a kid and I’d always had this fascination with the form of magazines – free gifts and cut out coupons and letters pages. Finding there was a big scene of scrappy homemade versions of magazines was wonderful, and also tied into to other interests like anarcho politics, feminism, punk, etc etc. I grew up in the countryside and our house was down a long lane. Once I was home from college I was miles from anyone so my lifeline was MSN messenger until I found mailart and zines. It was the first time I felt connected to other weirdos and gave me hope that I could get to a city and find some in real life, which I did as soon as I could. So while I’ve read zines since that are more interesting or better written, those first zines will always be special.

 

ZL – You’ve just announced your first recipient hit on the heels of what looked like an extremely well received launch, how does that feel?

 

ZNY – It’s been very unexpected – we were hoping for maybe 50 instagram followers and to tick over quietly but then we got 800 followers in the first week and we’re still growing. The project was conceived as a small and self-sustaining project (basically we committed to putting our own money in for the first year) that didn’t need donations. So we didn’t think massively about getting attention other than trying to get the word out to people who might want printing. But now that people do seems to have noticed us then it’s nice to think that our featured zinesters might get some extra readers. And getting some donations has meant that we can increase our monthly budget which is really exciting.

 

ZL – You get to build the world’s most exciting web platform, people flock to see it, which five creators do you first showcase and why?

Jacq Applebee on WordPress
Written in Shadows by Jacq Applebee, first to be published by Zines Need You!

ZNY – First up would be Jacq Applebee, our February zinester, because they write about so many different topics with realness and humour and generosity. I would love a world where Jacq’s zines got left around on bus seats and in hotel rooms so that people who really needed them would stumble across them.

Then it’d be Saffa Khan who is well known in the scene but should really be a household name. She makes these exquisite and intimate zines that are precious and profound and beautiful – she has her own risograph machine and has really pushed things forwards with her use of colour and interesting layouts. I always want there to be a space for splotchy cut and paste zines but I love that there are DIY artists making things beautiful too.

Third and fourth is a double whammy of Holly Casio and Seleena Laverne Daye who each put out their own zines but  are close friends who met as penfriends on Teletext back in the day! They’ve been around zines longer than me and they kind of personify what I love about DIY – I first came across them as radical cheerleaders supporting The Gossip in 2003, since then between them they’ve been making art, zines, podcasts and loads of other shit. Since people are flocking to see my web platform I’d hope their showcase meant they could spend less time working and more time making glorious weird shit because it makes the world better. It’s hard to pick a final creator because I could go on forever so I’m going to pick a non zine wildcard, Kensuke Koike who is a collage artist I follow on instagram. His work is so simple and total genius, he manages to conjure humour, subversion and the unexpected out of a few cuts in old photos. It’s nice to run across people who spark off that sense of wonder and possibility with their work so I would recommend him to everyone, not that he needs my help!

 

 

all art copyright and trademark it’s respective owners.

content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

The Short List – Douglas Noble

 

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ZL – In my mind, Jazz Creepers is your first anthology and did amazingly well. From a personal note, I was just jealous at the fact you got Sarah Horrocks, Gareth Hopkins and Paul J Milne all in one anthology, 3 favourites of mine! Why did you decide on an anthology and what was the experience like organising contributions?

 

DN – The title jumped out of a conversation Paul and I were having, and after a couple of days of it rattling around my head I found myself seized by the urge to make that the title of an anthology. The look and feel of it was pretty much all there from the off, even down to the design of the cover and the idea to integrate art from the past into the comic, and it really coalesced after talking it through with Sarah Gordon, who is also in the first issue.

As an anthology Jazz Creepers has only two rules: Florid, and no autobiography.

After that I just asked people who I knew or who’s work I liked, told them the rules and let them get on with it. Of course, not everyone was available, or able to contribute, but I was extremely lucky to get exactly who I had first imagined in there in there. I knew everyone involved would make great comics, so was very hands off in terms of editorial involvement.

Organising how everything fit together was maybe the part that I enjoyed the most. There’s a specific aesthetic to Jazz Creepers: ripe fruit, velvet, the masquerade, and peeling paint. It was fun to try and preserve that in the flow of reading the comic, flitting between stories in a way that made sense, making sure everything fitted in, and making sure that the design of the comic helped the whole cohere into something that reflected the intention.

The award seemed to say that it did. Next time, it’ll be even better.

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

DN – I came to comics fairly late, though having thought about it, I keep revising the date back.

Was it Colin McNeil’s splatterpunk take on the world of Judge Dredd in Chopper: Song of the Surfer,with its splurging sunset golds and russets, violence refracted to the abstract through a kaleidoscope of colour? Or earlier, John Ridgway in Doctor Who Magazine; lines scratching into the page, nervous and febrile, pushing the TV show toward the epic? Or before that, maybe The Quest for the Gloop, with its wild flights of fancy, it’s weird worlds and textures?

 

 

ZL – You are gifted the opportunity to set up a new museum showcasing all of the creators who have influenced you from birth to now.  The first show is called ‘First, Formative and Now’ who do you pick and why?

DN – It’s a grand museum this. A great sweeping thing of interlocking chambers and vaulted ceilings, a museum with weight behind it, so it’s only fitting that it should house my vast obsessions and passions.

The first chamber: A visitor walks up into an enormous blue space, like a summer sky, and there in the centre of that space is a golden column, quite thin, with a black sphere atop it. The visitor can walk around and around it, and, if they reach out and squeeze the sphere, it will make a noise.

HONK!

03-01
Harpo Marx

At that sound screens drop down from the ceiling and the image of Harpo Marx flicks across them, mute, in constant motion. Running and chasing and doing impossible things. Unlike anything and utterly true to himself.

 

The second chamber: A green room, like the colour of a hillside at dusk, clover flowers on the walls. In great slashes of charcoal, the art of Carol Swain.  Swain’s work is something that stays with me, and towers over comics in general. There’s an essentiality about it, a truth to it. Her landscapes of borderlands and between places speaks to the places that I grew up. The elliptical tilt of her stories is an angle that appeals to me.

03-02
Carol Swain comic page

The Third Chamber: A room full of old nitrate stock, and in the centre a candle. Old peepshow machines lining a wall, each with a different Guy Maddin film playing. I think the reason I enjoy his work so much is that it explodes the normal tools for building stories and finds new ways to say things. It takes fragments of the past, grafts them onto current techniques, and produce a glorious hybrid – something that never existed but should have. Something like his recent Seances builds a wonderful, never to be repeated experience from the bricks of lost films.

03-03
Guy Maddin

 

ZL – What one publication would you choose if you had to choose something for all the world to read?

04-01
Flannery O’Connor The Violent Bear It Away cover

DN – Under my benevolent fist, my troops will round up my people and force them to brutalist storerooms where everyone will be provided with a copy of Flannery O’Connor’s The Violent Bear It Away. They’d be given strict instructions to devour it, to give in to it; in short, to be the good and loyal citizens that I demand. They will thank me.

It’s a sensuous, lyrical book, tense and muscular, about the awful weight of destiny and the race to outrun it. It starts with the death of a prophet, and follows his nephew as he rejects both a religious and a spiritual life. There is fire along the way. I can’t recommend it highly enough.

 

 

 

ZL – If you could live for a day in the body of any creator and experience what it was like for them to create, who would you choose?

05-01
Sculptor Elisabeth Frink

DN – I’d choose a sculptor, because it’s a medium that I haven’t really worked in, and the physicality of it, the fight and the heft of it is something that appeals. I think that Elisabeth Frink is wonderful – the textures and life that she managed to put into her work is something that seems almost channelled rather than decided upon.  So, Frink then, building up one of her shattered ravens, or facing the solidity of making something real.

 

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

The Short List – J Edward Scott

Disclosure – I am working with Ed on a small zine with no set publication date as yet 

ZL –  You have a very idiosyncratic and personal style to your comics, but one very situated within the history of UK comics, how did you arrive at your style and how satisfied are you with it?

 

JES – When I started drawing with a view to doing it seriously, I did that thing most people do which is drawing in a way you think is how you’re meant to draw. In my case, to start with, that style was newspaper editorial cartoons, somewhere between Steve Bell and Ralph Steadman because that was what I wanted to do out of university. Probably (Gerald) Scarfe was in there too, but he is such an egregious old wind-bag, I’m less keen to admit to being fan. I then tried to simplify my style when I started doing small press Page 7 - Full Page Spreadcomics, trying to be like Tom Gauld (who I still love). Then I thought I’d try and go ultra-realistic like Brian Bolland or Arthur Ranson and do a long form gothic Frankenstein story (currently unfinished and mouldering in my parent’s attic). Anyway, the best piece of advice I ever heard was from a Chanel 4 fly-on-the-wall documentary about a kid trying to become a graffiti artist and the guy coaching him was having a go at him for not drawing enough. You should be drawing all the time, draw anything, develop your style. So I tried to focus on just draw things ‘wrong’ until I found out what the wrong drawings were trying to tell me. So that’s sort of it. Also, I creep in Kevin O’Neil and Mike McMahon’s house at the dead of night and suck bits of their brain out with a straw. Did I mention I have Michael Moorcock’s head in jar?Page 3 - Magic healing

 

 

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

JES – I really loved the Beano like most kids growing up. I also really enjoyed Adam West era Batman and the cartoon at the start of the show which I think got me hooked on cartoon violence. He-Man is lurking in Blade of Arozone, which is hardly surprising. Akira blew the back of my head off when I bought the first volume when I was a teenager after seeing the film on BBC 2. A big thing I am channelling at the moment is the Warhammer art of people like Ian Miller, Paul Bonner, Kev ‘Goblinmaster’ Adams and John Blanche, which I was obsessively into as a kid. I was actually more into Warhammer than comics growing up!

 

ZL – Do you yearn to work in colour?

JES – Working in black and white was originally a practical choice because I was printing comics on a photocopier in Kinko’s (RIP) and I knew colour would cost more. I’m not averse to colour, but I really like that feeling of black, inky comics, so I will be monochrome for a while certainly.

 

ZL – You are gifted the opportunity to set up a new museum showcasing all of the creators who have influenced you from birth to now.  The first show is called ‘First, Formative and Now’ who do you pick and why?  Page 12 - Single inky panel goodness

JES – Growing up in the 90’s there happened to be a lot of documentaries about underground comics, so I remember Robert Crumb being the first example of a guy being vaguely ‘rock and roll’ but not being a musician but instead doing something I could do (since I was no good at music). Formative is definitely Simon Bisley, who I tried to emulate as a teen-ager (with zero success). Current is a long list, but in terms of style, energy and imagination (not to mention jaw-dropping work ethic) I’m a big fan of Hyena Hell. On reflection, that’s the exhibition that taste forgot, isn’t it?

 

ZL – You’re due to release the second issue of your comic ‘The Blade of Arozone’, how well has the first issue done and how different are you feelings now compared to when you released the first one? Blade of Arozone

JES – I’m pretty buoyant at the moment – I’ve had some really good feed-back and some great support, especially from Tom Oldham of Breakdown Press and Gosh Comics. I’m mainly glad to have gone from being a guy who used to make small press comics a decade ago to a guy who makes small press comics again. I also really want to tell this story, so the fact there is a willing audience is excellent. The alternative was handing out pamphlets about Death Priests and Elderkin on the streets. There’s always that to fall back on, of course.

 

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

The Short List – Nyx of Sea Green Zines

Disclosure – I have worked with Nyx on a contributor’s copy only zine before and am currently working with her on an anthology planned to release in June.

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ZL – You were one of the first YouTube channels to discuss zines, but there seems to be a wave of sites recently, how does that feel?

Nyx – I’m struggling for the right words, to be honest. When I started reviewing zines on my blog, zine enthusiasts seemed few and far between when you stepped off the We Make Zines site. And when you did find others, you’d almost be just as likely to find places that hadn’t been updated in a long time or clearly stated they wouldn’t be posting/reviewing/etc anymore. I hesitate to call it ‘renewed’ enthusiasm because there are many people who were there all along, but it does feel thrilling to be able to see so many sites, channels, and socials popping up where people are letting their zine love shine.

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

Nyx – I always loved books and reading, but the first time I truly fell in love with a book – or any creative work for that matter – is when I read The Blue Sword by Robin McKinley. I fell completely and utterly in love with the world she created (since before I could read, I’d had a strange, unexplainable conviction that I was meant to be in a much more arid environment than I was), I loved the main character, Harry, who just wanted to fit in, and I of course loved the adventure of hidden heritage and going with your heart even when your head didn’t quite understand.

I rented and re-rented The Blue Sword from the library so many times, always desperately hoping that it would end up in the excess bin where I could purchase it. (The internet existed, but I certainly didn’t have a bank or credit card to use online.) That book gave me the courage to write my own first novel with a world all my own. A novel I would spend a lot of my pre-teen and teen years rewriting many times and loving every minute of it.

 

ZL  – Given an unlimited budget and all the time in the world, what would be the project you’d make to be remembered by?

Nyx – Oh, my gosh. That is a question I think about quite a bit, both on the darker side with life being what it is and wondering if/how I’d be remembered and on the lighter side with what I would like to do had I the ability. My first thought went straight to a dream of mine to set up a multi-vendor website for zinemakers that doesn’t charge a huge amount of fees – big fees being a huge hindrance to people who want to sell $1-$5 items.

With an unlimited budget and all the time in the world, though, that would be thinking too small.Don't Call Me Cupcake 1

I would love to be able to set up a beautiful, relaxing distro bistro. Ha ha ha. A nice, open space that has coffee and nice food, plenty of tables and some comfy couches/chairs, a zine library section, and a zine shop as well. There would be a performance space in the corner for bands and zine readings as well as an adjoining room or two for holding workshops, zine club meetings, and we could even bring in travelling zinemakers to chat about what they’re working on – who could then sell their goods in the shop, of course.

This building would be paid for in full and a trust put into place so no one would have to contemplate selling it to pay the bills, etc. There’d be solar, water filters, and even a community garden space out back.

That might still be thinking too small, but I reckon it’d be fabulous.

 

ZL  – You’ve decided to start a distro up, can you give us some details about that and how it feels being trusted to rep other creators’ work?

Nyx – That I certainly have! I remember years back when I was first diving into zines: I was reading Stolen Sharpie Revolution, and when I got to the part about distros, I thought, “I want to run a distro someday.” Here we have the first little step. The distro will be officially opening within the next month – barring any hiccups. It will be its own shop tab on Sea Green Zines and will launch stocked with zines from Australia, Japan, and the US as well as my own.

Zine Pile

These kind of things need to be taken slowly and carefully if they are meant to last, so I’ve only been able to approach a few zinemakers so far. (I’m not selling on consignment and thus am approaching zinemakers instead of the other way around.) With reviewing, it’s all about my love for a zine. As a distro, it’s not enough to just love a zine; the zinemaker needs to trust me with their work. To have all positive responses so far has been absolutely brilliant.

 

ZL – I know you talked a little about having been published as a prose writer, but not in any great detail, could you tell us a bit about the experience?

Nyx – I’ve been writing stories since I could write. Even when I was very young, I understood that I was physically born to my biological family, but I was convinced that I wasn’t where I should be. Where I’d truly come from and where I belonged. I spent a lot of time thinking about that ‘other’ place and writing the stories that bloomed from there.

My first stories were not nearly so serious, though. One was about my brother letting out a nuclear fart that made humanity move to Mars, and another one about the ‘real’ story of the three little pigs and how history had it all wrong. Funny how I was so sympathetic to the wolf back then when, many years later, I’d start a series about werewolves.

I’ve been published in a few anthologies with short stories and non-fiction (Chicken Soup for the Soul if you’re familiar). I was lucky in that the experiences of submitting were clear cut and not at all vicious. Yes or no, read the contract at least a few times if it’s ‘yes’. It was an easy, straightforward introduction to mainstream publishing.

My three novels are self-published, though. I was never very patient, and that was to my detriment given the first book could use a rewrite. Live and learn, right? I taught myself along the way about formatting, layout, and so on, and it gave me the chance to meet a lot of great people who were/are cover designers, freelance editors, etc.

I adore zines through and through, but writing will always be my first love.

 

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

Review – Drawn Poorly Zine – Identity

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This is an interesting zine for me.

It’s one that’s as much ‘what I bring to the party’ as it is one that is about the work itself.  I’m going to get a mildly philosophical, political and personal – so be warned!

There’s a discussion to have here about the project itself, around purpose and worth. This includes the wider discussion about identity and what that means and is at points in life.

A separate discussion about the actual physical issue and its content is needed as well.

 

My identity and chronic illness, or; identity, it’s not for everyone

Oddly, for someone who’s pretty healthy currently, my life has a few eras of chronic illness that mark my identity. I’m not sure I should delve too much about these matters as that’s not really the point of a review, to talk about myself in detail, is it? Yet, considering the project, I think it is the point, will I find my reflection or feel left out?

There are pieces in here that are so close to the bone of my own experiences that I’m never going to manage any kind of distance to discuss quality. However, there’s an argument to make about the worth of that experience in itself, (which I’ll make shortly).

Starting at the macro then; philosophically I have an issue with the conception of identity in and of itself. It’s one of those reductive concepts that imply a person is a thing and a thing is a single whole. By which I mean, to be personal for a second, people often believe a way of feeling or an experience means you have AN identity. I’m a white, middle-class man. That’s apparently AN identity, except, I’m someone who has mental health issues and I’m someone with a history of chronic illness and I’m someone who parents a child with chronic illness and that child happens to have learning difficulties. Oh, and I grew up as the child of hippies in a working-class area, in the 80’s in Wales, in a post-industrial town. So where do I have my IDENTITY in that, as opposed to talking about the experiences that have shaped me as a person?

Also, there’s the opposite side of this which talks about the identity of a group as if it’s all the same for each one. What is the identity of those with learning difficulties, for example, it’s different for my child than it is for someone with autism or downs syndrome. I’m pretty sure the experience of a person in America is different from a person in the UK, especially, getting back to subject, when it comes to chronic illness, because at least we in the UK don’t have to worry about paying for our medication or suffering or dying because we can’t. That’s a real and true issue in America.

There’s the further issue of awareness outside of that identity group. I wonder how many people could even conjure an understanding of why I’d mention growing up in Wales in the 80’s without just thinking about neon wearing kids dancing to Duran Duran, because, you know THE 80’S. I’ll tell you, that’s literally NOT what it was like then and gives the absolutely the wrong image of what it was. So, as I say, identity is just a great way to allow stereotyping, misconception and failed understanding. Even with good intentions. I’ll also call out identity as a renamed bigotry in certain hands. Everyone knows disabled people are in wheelchairs, so only wheelchair users are disabled? Sound familiar? Thought it yourself? I encounter exactly that attitude every day.

I guess what I’m trying to say is that identity sounds simple, but I believe it is essentialist, reductive, stereotyping and exclusionary more often than not.

I’ve had a 6 month long stay in hospital because of a childhood illness, I’ve had nearly 9 months in a hospital hospice because of my first child’s initial health issues. So am I the parent who was a sick child, the parent of a sick child, the parent (who was a sick child) of a sick child. Where does my niche go and where does my experience fail to meet the description and purpose and in failing to meet that do I end up feeling like my IDENTITY is not true, angry at not seeing myself represented?

Mission Statement
Mission Statement

Am I seeing too narrow a stereotype or caricature and what is the impact of that being delivered to the public as well? Will they, the inexperienced, limit themselves by only understanding the issue as represented here?

That really is the matter for the project to consider and the yard stick against which to measure it. How does it deal with these matters of representation, of diversity, of essentially becoming a gate keeper simply by existing!?

That’s a heavy matter, particularly considering who it is trying to represent, people already suffering in life in some way, shape or form.

 

The Project

I can see why the first issue dealt with identity. It’s a matter of setting out your stall, delivering your agenda for all to see. It really does need to be up front, because it really does tell you whether you’re in or out of this project. I know I keep banging on about this, and I’ll get to it, honestly!

First though I want to talk about another matter of inclusivity outside of the politics of representation. Does the zine communicate effectively with people who have a wide range of need, including some who may have learning difficulties? Can it deal with all of these when it is a project that relies upon open submissions? Particularly when it’s dealing with the cross-over of chronic illness and artistic expression?

I think they’ve done some very clever things that mean that this project is accessible to a wide range of needs. I’m know for certain that some of these works by themselves would communicate to my child with learning difficulties. Yet the editorial approach has made the issues raised in those works accessible to them. I’m no mind reader so I won’t claim to know whether they planned that or came upon those solutions by other routes. In the end that’s not what matters, it’s accessible in a very clever and low-key manner. I want to pick up on that here, because I think it speaks clearly about the strength of this project, it’s humanity and openess.

On the second inside page they have a whole series of speech balloons summarising the content and opinions of those present in the zine. Pithy little comments that give quick insights into their experiences. It’s a clever way of priming people to the content they’re about to encounter.

Speech Balloon Summary
Speech Balloon Summaries

It’s also a good way of making some of the internal, often expressionistic or abstract work, more accessible to those who can’t understand complex abstract ideas. It means that, although certain work will never mean much to my child, I can still have a conversation around the subject that it deals with. It frees the art up to be expressive, whilst still highlighting the content in a way that’s not forced or invasive to the art.

I’m also pleased that it’s meeting its own criteria of talking about both chronic illness and art dealing with chronic illness. The art is served well, with good reproduction and the physical item itself is on lovely paper with decent printing. More importantly, to me, it’s cleanly laid out and well labelled with details of the contributors, so it’s easy enough to go and find out more about their work if you want to. Simply put, it’s a well put together package, well edited to make it as accessible as a resource as well as a magazine to be enjoyed in and of itself. The mix and pacing of image and text is also well handled.

The project is also an interesting manner of dealing with chronic illness, dealing with aspects of daily life as well as more philosophical matters, for example, the second issue deals with having a sex life with a chronic illness. Identity is an interesting point, but it’s very BIG PICTURE. Sometimes you just want to know how to live through a day and the philosophy of it all matters much less.

I can imagine these being a great resource both online and within hospitals. A good library of these dealing with the philosophical and practical matters of life will make a good companion for someone dealing with chronic illness in their life, whether their own or someone else’s. Considering the subject, I think that’s important and appropriate. What’s the point in having this if it’s not a resource to help those it’s talking about.

 

The Issue

So, finally, to talk about what’s in here on both the macro and micro scale, by which I mean – how well do I think it deals with the issue of identity and the associated matter of representation and what do I feel after reading the contributions included in here.

Well, firstly, some pieces are privileged with the nature of my own experience reflecting their content. There are those that aren’t and are still fascinating and there are those that aren’t my sort of thing. That’s again a ‘me’ thing though.

There’s a diverse range of experience. There are pieces that are short and blunt, some more like memoir. What all of them have in common, is that they talk about the personal, not the abstract. These are about PEOPLE talking about their experiences. Really, that’s how it gets around the matter of philosophy and politics. Everything is grounded in people and their experiences. The editorial team also take great care to identify that they are trying to reach out to as diverse a population as possible. The content is treated with respect, but the editorial tone is light, open and welcoming. It’s an encouraging approach, not a distancing one.

There is a work in here that I found fascinating as an artwork communicating the intangible. It tries to make visible the invisible and uses such a beautifully simple idea it’s almost poetic. Considering that the solution is crumpled pieces of paper, I’m genuinely surprised by how visually interesting it is as well. I’m intrigued to see more, just because I can buy into that simple visual communication. It makes it very quick to get an insight into how day to day life can be for that person and for all suffers of endometriosis.

It also speaks of how different approaches can evoke different reactions in different people for different reasons. A piece like that, so abstract and so different from my experiences. My access into that is very much an appreciation of it as a method of communication, it’s an intellectual reaction entirely.

Very early on in this review I raised my own question about seeing myself reflected in pieces and how that skewed my ‘critical’ reaction to them, and what that meant within the context of this zine.

Front Cover
Front Cover – Indentity

Well, I think it speaks volumes that there are pieces, dealing with people’s experiences of illness that are not mine, that can still evoke or trigger recognition in me. In particular there is a very succinct piece (similar in visual style to the cover) that so sharply reflected one of the worst experiences of my child’s early illness that I was nearly shocked to tears at the memory.

I think it’s that recognition that gives this zine it’s power. I get to see someone whose illness, whose circumstances aren’t my own, reflecting my own feelings, so I get to see that not everything I experienced is niche, is my burden and mine alone. I think that I’m never going to identify with identity, but I can experience the sense of belonging to a community with shared experiences. Really, that’s the greatest comfort you can offer anyone who feels isolated and alone, the opportunity to recognise that there’s a community of people just like them in the world, even though they are not like them. This project delivers on that opportunity.

The Short List – NiceZines

Nice Zines Logo

nicezines – shout outs for zines

 

ZL – What made you choose to start promoting zines?

NZ – I started nicezines on tumblr in 2012 when I was in university. I did a degree in book arts and design (It was all about fine art bookbinding mixed with whatever design you were into, a sad side of this is that that degree course no longer exists) I love all printed matter and wanted to share all the amazing artists I was finding whilst doing my own research on projects.

Yoshitomo Nara Cover

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

NZ – Anything by Yoshitomo Nara and everything in ‘Nobody Knows: Yoshitomo Nara Drawing’

 

 

 

 

ZL – Given an unlimited budget and all the time in the world, what would be the project you’d make to be remembered by?  NiceZines insta feed

NZ – I’d love to turn nicezines into a publishing house, that would be super cool and so much fun.

 

ZL – Why an instagram account and not a review zine?

NZ – I’ve never thought about making one of those before! I love using Instagram though because it’s free and you can easily reach so many people around the world.

 

 

ZL – What one publication would you choose if you had to choose something for all the world to read?

NZ – Private Eye I’m a huge fan of satire mixed with current affairs.

 

 

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

Review – Pocket Thoughts Annual #1

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Pocket Thoughts Annual #1

I love this little 16 pager in both thought and fact.

 

The Thought

It’s a gathering of a whole murders row of zinesters who gang about with each other online, by which I mean, there’s the core of a whole online scene here.  The thought that appeals so much here is the feeling that someone’s gathering up the troupe to put on a classic repartee performance for the audience. It’s the zine equivalent of a British ensemble cast. They all have their character they do so well that you never tire of seeing them do it. They’re all so good at what they do, they bring something new to it. They all like each other so much, that they just play together well and it’s damn fun to watch it all happen.

I love the thought that someone has finally put together this little scene as a physical object, it feels like the moment a notional thought has coalesced, a dream made reality is probably a step to far, maybe more a zine scene fest for your pocket?

The fact it’s a 16 pager of curated guests is as fitting as it gets really. Proper zine scene diy glory at its photocopied, immediate best. I should clarify why I say curated. Even if this wasn’t a by invitation production (by which I mean – I  have no knowledge of whether this was by invitation, or just ended up this way) you can still see who is in touch with who in this scene here. It’s really, as I say, a murders row of all the biggies in their scene. This isn’t some exclusionary thing though, just a gang of online friends putting a best foot forward for the fun of it to let people know what they’re at and invite them all in on it.

 

The Fact

It is a great little zine with everybody putting in a great turn. I literally liked everything in there. All killer, no filler is fair here – depending on your tastes of course. To expand a bit on that – this is just a great collection of zine creations. Its very typically zine; rough, Contents Listall about the personal. It get’s in there and talks quick and cheap or it speaks it’s own poetic idiom and asks you to meet it with your arms open. By that measure, everything is great because I feel that I get to know each contributor from their single page, there’s not one where I come away wandering what that person is about. As the zine is labelled ‘a showcase of zinesters from around the world’ you can’t ask for more.

For my own personal tastes, there are some that I connected with more than the others, but that’s more about me and my tastes and nature than it is about the quality of one over the other. I’m not going to go over them all, but 2 examples that stand out are Richard Larios’s (feral publications) piece, which is just so quick and blunt and to the point it made me absolutely smile. Literally the zine equivalent of a hardcore punk 30 second blast of rage. I don’t know if anyone knows who Steve Ditko is or what his later career after SpiderMan and Doctor Strange was like, but this had that same blunt, political smash of his later work (though a different political take). Latibule’s piece just struck a chord with its cleverly poetic image. What struck me was the way they both use the same language, but one is spitting and the other is singing (both in the best way).

To stop myself disappearing into a detailed little synopsis of every piece, what I want to say is that I like how the pieces have been ordered as much as I like the pieces. I like that there’s such a range of style and approach, but I also think that the individual pieces have been placed in an order that flatters each piece as part of the whole.

I’ve used the analogy of an album of music being about the whole rather than the strength of individual tracks and I think that this is the case here. What is all the more amazing is that this is the equivalent of a scene compilation but feels like an album and not a collection.

Really glad I got this and if you’re interested in zine scenes, this is a great little taster of this group.

 

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

The Short List – Tim Bird

NEW COMIC – Asleep In The Back

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Grey Area – publishe by Avery Hill

ZL – Why and when did you start making comics and how many comics have you made?

TB – As a kid I was always drawing – little cartoons of my friends and family, doodles, comic strips. My friend came up with a character called Pseudoboy and I drew some comics about him, but it never occurred to me to publish them or show them to people outside my friendship group. It wasn’t until I visited Thought Bubble in 2010 that I realised there was such a large community of comic book creators self-publishing their work and I wanted to get involved! I started doing diary comics that I shared online and began a series called Grey Area, which was published by Avery Hill Publishing. There were four issues of Grey Area, and I self-published a few short comics before I made my first graphic novel, The Great North Wood, which was also published by Avery Hill Publishing last year.

I’ve also made lots of other short comics for various anthologies like Dirty Rotten Comics, Over The Line and Off Life.

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

TB – I vividly remember my dad reading Tintin comics to me when I was very young, explaining how speech bubbles and thought bubbles worked, and how you followed the story by moving from one panel to the next. One image in particular stayed with me – a

TinTin
Tintin – Rascar Capac

character called Rascar Capac breaking through a window to throw a crystal ball full of poison at Tintin. It was terrifying to me when I was young, but I would dare myself to look at it and try and draw it.

 

 

 

 

 

ZL – I currently own only one of your comics, but really treasure it, ‘Rock & Pop‘. What impressed me was the way you took many short anecdotes and wound them into such an emotive narrative. How did you work how what would be in the story and how to pull it together?

Rock & Pop
Rock & Pop – Great little comic

TB – Rock & Pop started as a webcomic. The idea was to draw and post online one comic a week about a song that had inspired me or that I felt related to an important moment in my life. I started with songs that had felt important to me as a child (like Belinda Carlisle!) and continued through being a teenager, moving to London, meeting my wife, and having kids. The narrative all comes from my life, being interested in music. Just growing up really. People really responded to the webcomic, so collecting them for a print edition seemed like the right thing to do. Since self-publishing it, I’ve asked other people to send me comics based on their own responses to songs important to them, and have been posting them online – various-artists.co.uk (I’m always looking for new contributors for this!)

 

Various Artists
Various Artists – Tim’s music anthology website – Always seeking contributors

 

ZL – You’ve recently had your first graphic novel published, ‘The Great North Wood‘. I know you’ve published smaller works prior to that. What was the main difference between the two experiences?

TB – I tried to be more disciplined when I was writing the Great North Wood, making sure I had all the pages fully planned before I started drawing. With my shorter comics I often start drawing without really knowing where the story will end up, but with this longer project I thought I’d run into problems if I tried to do that. I spent a lot of time doing research for the book – studying the history of the area that the book’s about, and reading about folklore associated with forests and woodlands.   15    I think the fact that it’s a longer a piece of work, and took longer to create, means I invested more into it emotionally, and feel really attached to it. A lot of my comics are about a feeling of connection with a specific place, and spending so long writing about south-east London for this book has increased my bond with the area. I’ve recently finished a short comic called Asleep In The Back, and it’s been nice to feel a bit less involved with a piece of work – to put it down and move on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ZL – Which one creator you love seeing do you feel the world knows too little about, and what would you like to tell us about them?

TB – I don’t know about in comics – there’s so much good work being made right now that I don’t think I can pick just one creator to tell you about! In music though, I’m always surprised Debsey Wykes isn’t more well known. She sang backing vocals for Saint Etienne and has fronted two bands – Dolly Mixture and Birdie. They’re both great!

 

 

 

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

The Short List – wing three comics

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ZL – I’ve only seen your work on your instagram account, but I see that you produced or were producing a black and white zine, was this made and, considering how much of your account is in colour, why go with black and white?

WTC – The black and white zine is called “Clara” and is incomplete. I printed out a few copies of Part One to submit to the Laydeez do Comics award on my home printer. I was not successful in my award application and received feedback that it wasn’t clear – which

Clara
Clara – Graphic novel in progress

I agree with. This was the first time I ever submitted anything! I will keep working on it. At the moment, I’m planning for it to be a three-part series. Clara is hand-drawn in pencil. The pencil drawings started as rough sketches but then I received positive feedback on the pencil, so I kept it. I scanned the pencil drawings and used the multiplication tool in Photoshop to get the black and white look. The black and white aesthetic is a better match for the story about grief than the bright colours I often use in my sketches.

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

WTC – I remember discovering Frida Kahlo when I was a teenager. It was that time of life when I was exploring what it meant to be an individual and a woman for the first time. I was also suffering from chronic pain, so I connected with her physical and metaphysical suffering. I grew up in the countryside in the US and didn’t have many opportunities to see fine art. I first saw her paintings in books, so it wasn’t a single piece of work – it was her lifetime of self-portraits. I think her use of colour has stuck with me ever since.

Comics is an artform I discovered later in life. The first comics I totally loved was the Love and Rockets series by Gilbert and Jamie Hernandez. It completely blew my mind. They created a rich world of complex characters and great storylines that inspired me to want to do the same. It’s a crazy hard thing to do!

Underground Art - Blue Orange Guy
Underground Art – Blue Orange Guy

ZL – Someone contacts you and say they want you offer you a year long residency. Where would be your ideal location and what would you produce?

WTC – My ideal location would be the Japanese countryside. I would travel there with no expectations of what I would produce and see what happens.

 

ZL – I’m particularly in love with the texture of your Instagram images and wondered how what you use to create those images?

WTC – Thank you! My instagram account is mainly filled with London tube portraits. I use small brown paper sketchbooks from Paperchase that have this slightly grainy texture. They are the right size for clandestine drawing in public places! I use a mixture of posca pens and wax crayons. I look to draw people who are either asleep or

Underground Art - Pink Lips
Underground Art – Pink Lips

completely absorbed in a book or their phones, that’s why most have their eyes closed. I sketch with Posca pens and colour in my sketches with crayon at a later time. I rediscovered crayons on a train journey from London to Edinburgh while drawing with my kids. Kids are so good at mixed media!

 

ZL – Your colour choices are really exciting and individual, what is the most important influence on those choices and do you draw inspiration from a specific practitioner or style?

WTC – I love contrast – be it black and white minimalism or bright loud colours. I think my early influences helped develop my taste. Frida Kahlo, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Mark Rothko were my first loves in art. One artist who recently made a huge impact on my colour choices is Lisa Brice. I saw her exhibit at Tate Britain and completely fell in love with her use of blue.

 

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Previous Interview – The Short List – Mattias Gunnarrson

 

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

Review – Coffee & People 1 & 2

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five o'clock zines header

 

 

 

I don’t intend doing this often but Craig is someone who promotes zines and zinesters very effectively on his instagram account five o’clock zine – go follow that link and check out all of his reviews.

 

 

 

Review – Coffee & People 1 & 2

Two classic mini-zines this time round. A7 single pagers, typed and pasted up then photocopied and stuck down.

A lovely, immediate and simple format.

Coffee & People
Coffee & People – the perfectly formed mini-zone format

A format perfect for the two little stories told in these zines.

It’s very easy to say (and imagine) that such zines are just quickly thrown together, with little thought and can be quickly consumed and thrown away with little thought.  In truth the medium prevents great depths; the content likewise, is seemingly small and inconsequential in the grand scheme. All of this is true. All of this misses the whole point of the worth of these items.

These little zines are the hand of friendship reached out from another world, reaching a stranger in a strange land. They’re a conversation on a bus or bumping into the friend of friend you barely know. You may share the same proximity, but not the same world. They are in essence, one of the reasons I find great virtue in zines. They open ways of seeing I never knew existed and focus my eyes for a few minutes on existence as I’ve never seen it before.

Coffee & People
Coffee & People 1

Coffee & People works this well, keeping the language simple and clear, getting out of its own way and letting it be a conversation, rather than a didactic exercise or the florid flexing of some personal neuroses. What recommends these to me is getting to sit and experience a life never lived in a world I know nothing about, (something I’m always going to immediately like, it’s my current jam).

Coffee & People
Coffee & People 2

Of the two, issue 2 is my favourite with it being more focussed on what it’s telling us. It satisfies more, even though (or maybe because?) there’s less in it that I recognise from my own life.

 

I also like how inexplicit it is when coming full circle at the end.

In the end, these stories will not rock your world, they will not plumb the depths of the human soul. These stories will open your eyes to another human life and let you see what it’s like to be alive as that person, even if it’s only for a few minutes. If that’s your jam, then indulge with these homemade lovelies.

 

 

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Previous Review- Warglitter 1

 

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

The Short List – Mattias Gunnarrson

Disclosure – I should let you all know that I have worked with Mattias on a contributor copy only zine.

MASU sculpture project, Traces of Movement
MASU sculpture project Halmstad, Sweden Spring 2018 Traces of Movement

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ZL – You are an artist often working with groups or on large public pieces – what place do zines have in your work?

MG – Zines and self-published work have its own platform in my practice, and then it plays different roles in different projects. For example, there is one solo track where I draw by myself and collect the drawings on a blog (visual notes) where a constantly changing narrative occurs, one that I can look at for a better understanding of how I am working and what topics or methods interest me at the moment. These drawings are turned in to a type of random collage zines every three months or so like an archive of my drawing work. Another type of zine is the series ”MASU Works” that I do together with my colleague Susanne when we collaborate as MASU and do larger scale sculpture work both in urban public space and as Land Art in the forest.

MASU Works 5

We use MASU Works to collect sketches, try out new types of methods, document projects as well as invite writers or produce exhibition catalogues. MW has an open format, with no specific logo, size, design or purpose but is rather elastic in its framework for whatever is the content. MW is both an ongoing process for us,an artist collective and a way for us to distribute and share our work and we make issues when we have projects.

Besides this I am also part of a few different situations where self-publishing is involved where either zines are produced, traded or lectured about as well as collected, archived and discussed.

So, to conclude your question I think self-publishing is constantly present in my practice in different formats.

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time ?

MG – There are probably many of those moments that I have forgotten, but I think the one moment in recent years that took my breath away was the work of Tadashi Kawamata at Centre de Pompidou in Paris 2010. The actual exhibited pieces, a couple of loosely constructed huts or sheds that hung outside on the building facade, were of course great but what really got me was an image in a book from an older project: Apartment project “Tetra House N-3 W-26” 1983 Intervention in situ. In this project old wooden planks flow around the small house like the wind, almost encapsulating the building. The movement in the wood in relation to the solidness of the house is mindblowing.

Kawamata’s early projects really opened things up for me.

 

ZL – Given an unlimited budget and all the time in the world, what would be the project you’d make to be remembered by?

MG – Oh. It would be a project dealing with education.

I really like the Skateistan-project (www.skateistan.org) which started as a support structure for young girls in Afghanistan where they could go and learn how to skateboard, and once in the spot there was also education and an empowering environment. The project has branched out to more locations, also including boys.

Education for next generation global citizens is key.

So, if I had the means I would do projects like this in a bigger scale than I do now.

 

ZL – You work at a university that seems to have an amazing zine library, if you could suddenly find any one zine, what would be that treasure?

Organisation Is Not Neutral
Organisation Is Not Neutral Published January 2018

MG – 🙂 I am not sure about amazing yet, we are still very much setting it up, with just over 300 titles so far, but let’s hope we get there.

It is a difficult question, about the one great great treasure. I think for me it is mostly about the variety and the differences of the archive, that it holds  both writing and photo essays, screen printed zines and copy machined work, drawings, paintings, collages and poetry from professionals, students and kids. Of course it would be amazing with early works by Basquiat or Patty Smith, but still I believe that the zine world is not so much about stars and collectibles and rather about the possibility to get voices out and bypass the marketplace. So, I think the real gems in a zine collection are the ones where someone just could not resist telling the story, where it just had to be told.

 

ZL – Which one creator you love seeing do you feel the world knows too little about, and what would you like to tell us about them?

As I said before, Tadashi Kawamata is my always go-to artist. His way of working with materials, people and the space is extraordinary. Even though he is now realizing some real grand projects, I feel mostly connected to his smaller scale projects where there is such tactile connection between the different components. Also his drawings and models for the projects are incredible!

 

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Previous Interview – The Short List – mir.and.or

 

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

Warglitter Review

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Warglitter Issue 1

 

I believe in coincidence.

I know as fact that things just happen BECAUSE. Because being my personal truth, (personal truth – the little white lies that cover the cracks). BECAUSE meaning the millions of things that are always happening that you know nothing about, refuse to acknowledge, don’t want to talk about, aren’t interested in as they’re just not important enough to waste life time on, etc.

BECAUSE being like this – Did you know microwaves were first created in the late 40’s? Not really popular until the 80’s BECAUSE. You could list cost, acceptability, blah, blah, blah. It’s just easier to accept that it was BECAUSE and get on with life. Is that the same attitude you want to take towards your future, your relationships?

Because is a default for the shoulder shrug, the pulled face, the ‘a butterfly’s wing flapping…’, the defeatist ‘oh who can be bothered’. I say or think BECAUSE as it’s so hard to face the thing I’m becausing about. The question is, is that how to live a good life (by which I mean attain contentment), (Happiness and the search for it, is a GRAIL quest, the modern search for eternal life).

Getting back to track. BECAUSE, then, is the enemy of a reviewer really. It is too often treated as a friend though. I guess that comes down to space and TL:DR. Too often a reviewer states that you’ll like a thing, rather than discussing what it does and why that should matter. It’s the gatekeeper mentality – I’m cool and I’ll tell you what’s cool, not argue why it’s worth your time.

It’s what I’ve been fighting with when thinking of a review for Warglitter. My urge is to say – get it BECAUSE it’s AWESOME, (another catchall for – too big to tell you).

I mean; it’s true, but it’s not honest. Yes, the two can be exclusive. Honesty requires the commitment to fullness, truth requires you don’t lie. I am not believer in truth, personal or universal, in case it wasn’t clear from the above. I’m going to be honest and say, I believe any search for TRUTH is the opportunity to avoid personal honesty and responsibility.

Warglitter Zines

 

Now, you’ll be thinking, why are you telling me all this? (I like the sound of my own thoughts?) Well, because Warglitter – the person, not the zine – has crafted an amazing work where she’s starting to be honest with herself and maybe leaving the search for Truth behind. She may not even know it…

My evidence? Well, Warglitter lays out her purpose up front. She writes about why she writes a journal and tells us what commitments she made. She gives me all my clues right up front and right out clear.

These things are telling, to me at least.

  1. write down beliefs and personal truths – having beliefs and personal truths next to each other sounds like someone being honest and then hiding a truth they don’t want to witness, saying ‘they’re not beliefs, they’re personal truths…’

A new addition to the list

  1. dismantle your defence mechanism persona –having to go back and qualify and talk about personal psychology, about defences, seems a change in understanding. Time has given a gift of new understanding. Like 5 is the knee jerk reaction and then 8 is the slow dawning realisation of the Honest facts.

If that is the case, then these

  1. keep up a regular tarot practice and dig deep
  2. creating my next niche
  3. work through depression and learn from it

are the pendulum swinging between how to be Honest and how to hide from it.

  1. decorate this journal – make it a sacred object –says it all, fetishise that Truth. Then again, those later additions take it back down to earth – back to magic, down to earth. Pendulum swinging, swinging.

Being honest – why is this amazing?

There are so many echoes of what matters to me right now, what I’ve struggled with.

For me, this is a timely piece of work to appear before me.

It’s not what I’d do to deal with these subjects.

Likewise, Warglitter does things and holds belief that I have no personal commitment or interest in. Yet, here she is talking about things I’ve spent years struggling with, talking about things I’ve finally been able to think honestly about. Saying them in ways and contexts very different to mine and so making them clearer for me to see.

If you asked to label it, it’s a perzine verfremdung effect – I love Brecht’s idea that to make something more obvious, you should first make it appear strange.

It’s what I’m always hoping to achieve, but here made simple where I would hide it in layers of pomp.

That’s what I like about this, it’s like looking at my life but as I’ve never lived or experienced it, so I don’t have to hide from the truth it reveals.

What I take from this may not be what is meant by this and may not be what you get from this, but it is why I think this is an amazing piece of work.

I see that there is no solution to who you are, or what you’re feeling – there’s only being honest with yourself and dealing with those facts rather than just excusing yourself with BECAUSE, (because no one ever loved me, I’ll be unlovable… because I keep getting hurt, I’ll push everyone away – they’re all TRUE and you’ll never solve that TRUTH, you just have to be honest, face it and deal with it every day, but by facing it and putting it out there each day it might just get easier to be that better person, get that step closer to contentment and kindness.

This is a brave work and a hard path and deserves your attention because of the reward you may get from it.

The Short List – Warglitter Zines Interview

Previous Review: Intercorstal: Extension Review

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content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

The Short List – Shuffleplay comics

Disclosure – I should let you all know that I have worked with Shuffleplay Comics on a number of contributor copy only zines and am currently working with Shuffleplay on a project currently slated to publish in June.

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ZL – Your work often uses songs as inspiration, what is it about interpretting these works that appeals to you?

SPC – I would visualise stories and ideas behind song lyrics when I listen to music. It’s been a natural habit since my teens, but back then, I didn’t have the technical skills to implement my ideas. Now that I’m somewhat technically trained to make music videos, I just go at it every time I feel compelled to.

New Order - Regret

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

SPC – Oh wow, I can’t even remember. One of my all-time favourite illustrators is Tomer Hanuka and this picture has always stood out to me.

Tomer Hanuka
Tomer Hanuka

ZL – Given an unlimited budget and all the time in the world, what would be the project you’d make to be remembered by?

JR_08

 

SPC – I don’t have very long-termed projects nor do I want to be remembered. If 

I have unlimited time and budget though, I’ll probably hire people to build a huge sci-fi theme park. I’ll hire actors to play the roles of citizens in this made-up world. Everyone will have to wear space suits/dumb futuristic costumes just for the lulz. Only myself, my family and friends will have access to this place, muahahaha.

 

ZL – You’ve created a lot of high quality zines by now, which of these makes you most proud and why?

SFP – Hmm, probably Ghosting. The content’s kind of cringy now that I look back at it, but I’m amazed that I managed to stick to it for three months.

 

 

ZL – Which one creator you love seeing do you feel the world knows too little about, and what would you like to tell us about them?

SFPAdrian Tomine. He is already really well-known, but I’d always recommend his work, “Killing and Dying“.

 

 

 

previous post – The Short List – Livor Mortis Zine

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The Short List – Livor Mortis Zine

Disclosure – I should let you all know that I am currently at work on a collaborative zine with Livor Mortis Zine, release date TBC, and that I once won a competition for issue 3 of LMZ (a set of three beautiful zines).

IMG_7746

Livor Mortis Zine                                                                       stphnrttly

ZL – Why paper and not blogs?

LMZ – Being born in the mid-1980’s, I feel that I owe a lot to analogue in all formats; from VHS to vinyl, practical effects over CGI etc. Even though I use computers daily and understand the great advantages of digital outlets, however, I feel that a physical item is a lot nicer and more human. I specifically started LMZ based on glue, paper, scalpel etc and felt I should keep digital creation to a minimum. We can rely on paper a lot more as digital/technology is a lot more harmful towards us both physically and mentally.

With physical copies of a zine, you can distribute and interact outside, away from a computer. I am sure that most of the population like to touch what they can see, and I feel that adds greatly to the experience. Having physical copies on paper has led to opportunities I would have missed out on if I were to be blog based, like selling zines on a face-to-face basis.

This started with great assistance from Books Peckham (site & instagram) and DIY Space For London (DSFL site & instagram).

Their next zine fair is 17 thMarch 2019 @ 96-108 Ormside St, SE15 1TF.

Anyone that is interested in zines and DIY self-publishing should definitely visit.

One of my favourite zines of recent times was picked up (traded) at a previous zine fair at DSFL. It’s by Olga Writes Things and is titled ‘Body Hair: A Love/Hate Story’. Reading this really made me question how brainwashed our culture is by media. I would suggest reading this zine especially if you are open minded and not a sexist. I also appreciate how personal it is too, I doubt many people would be so direct and honest

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

LMZ – The first time I can remember really loving an artistic creation was probably as a 4/5 year old, whilst watching both ‘Ghostbusters’ the film and animated series. However, years later, the 2001 album ‘Mediocre Generica‘ by Leftover Crack really shaped me as a person and actually impacted my life for the better! It opened my eyes and ears to many different genres and styles of music. Before listening to that album, I was strictly into punk music and was quite ignorant and stubborn to entertain anything else.0045778043361.png.925x925_q90The album contains elements of ska, reggae, black metal, death metal and of course punk. It was definitely a great tool for mind expansion and propelled me violently into a world of mixing genres and breaking rules. Plus the lyrical content was perfect for my mentality as a teen; no pop-punk focused girl/boy relation dramas, just real talk and political anger. Without hearing this album, I do wonder if I would have ever spent 10 years running independent death metal record labels and if I would have stayed on a straight path and mixed with healthy society focused individuals. I do not really know many other bands that mix many alternative styles so well! Apart from the pre-fix of ‘Leftover Crack’, which is the band ‘Choking Victim’.
I can still listen to the album today and get wild enjoyment from it. ‘Mediocre Generica’ is not my favourite album, but it is totally an important release in terms of who I am today. I am sure LMZ carries some connection to the crack rock steady beat, away from the ‘INDK’ lyrics inside the front cover of issue 4.

 

ZL – Given an unlimited budget and all the time in the world, what would be the project you’d make to be remembered by?

LMZ – I literally had this conversation just the other day with a film maker friend of mine, we even started a script to be prepared for the day an unlimited budget comes our way! I won’t give away too much in terms of the overall direction, but the aim would be to focus on making a story to make people more aware and involved in stopping child abuse. I am sure I am not the only person who questions why the rich and powerful are always connected to extreme child abuse?! I know it is a nasty and emotionally destroying subject to even comprehend, but it is a vast problem all over the world.  If I could be involved in anything that would expose and shutdown child abusers and sex traffickers in general, I would be very happy. The budget would go on practical special FX (ideally Tom Savini ❤️) and getting really strong and respected actors/actresses involved so people would take notice.

Away from that, I would really like to be involved and remembered for something that would get Tony Blair and George Bush Jr executed for war crimes.
As the budget is unlimited, any leftover would be used to buy and delete Facebook.

 

 

ZL – Your images come from all around the world, where is your favourite place in the world you’ve never visited?

LMZ – Asia, especially the Far East! I would really like to go there and I am sure that I would never leave. In my head, it seems so alien compared to the world I live in, I’m sure it would feel like home. The level of excitement and fear is through the roof!
My passionate feelings towards the continent originated from Eastern cinema and anime. I remember watching films like ‘Urotsukidoji’ and ‘Hausu’ at a young age and being so impressed after getting tired of the typical Hollywood/Western film formula. The imagination and creativity out in the East is so rich, there is even a Japanese horror sub-genre which focuses on cat horror alone.
Another part of Asia I would like to experience is Bali, Indonesia. There is an annual festival that takes places there called ‘Nyepi’ aka ‘Day of Silence’.

nyepi

I do not think Google search results justify this festival, so take a look at the Instagram account @ogohogoh_bali

 

ZL – What single creation [book, zine, film, group, place, whatever!!] would you settle down with and just chill?

LMZ – I really chill with audio commentaries attached to cult Italian films such as Lucio Fulci’s ‘Gates Of Hell’ trilogy or any of Dario Argento’s early works for example. Last night I bulk listened to three commentaries on the early US slasher ‘The Burning’.

7e914caa5b54d29e1ae345243fc074a72f67c7b1r1-1024-800v2_hq

I find it really fascinating to hear all the behind-the-scenes details relating to the production of the final product. It is nice to be able to just listen to something, rather than watch. I guess I should check out some more podcasts!

The Blade Of Arozone – Review

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This is one comic I found on Instagram. It was genuinely a comic I bought simply because of the art (there’s a but later, I need to get the art out of my system first!). The art is fantastic in all ways, this being a fantasy comic and all.

First, just a huge shout out for how awesome the cover is.  Brilliant and beautiful and simple. Gold ink on a black background. Already setting the mood before you even open the comic.

The art inside is just as beautiful; noodled, line rich, DENSE. Everything looks like it’s been hewn from rocks and cragged masses, whether landscape, creature or person. Page 4 - Detailed, but easy to readBut most of all, it’s very, VERY British adventure weekly in all the ways I love. Yes, you can point to artists whose style I’m reminded of, characters that remind me of Jim Baikie’s ‘Skizz’ and the whole of Ian Gibson, particularly ‘Halo Jones’.  It reminds me of the density of Jesus Blasco certainly and you wouldn’t be wrong thinking about ‘Nemesis the Warlock’ by Kev O’Neill.  But most of all what it reminds me of is that idiosyncratic, characterful approach to art they all had.  Every artist making that work interesting, approaching it like any subject is worthy of being serious, even if it’s throw away.

This is not some sum of parts though, not some mash of influences, this is a world made from whole cloth.  That pattern might feature a colour of Michael Moorcock, a swirl of post apocolyptica, but those are just that, the colours, a bit of patterning. They’re not the whole design, the bigger picture is much bigger. As I say, everything is hewn from the same rock and it’s a mountain I’d say.

What I love about this is how good this is. Its skilful and thought about and integrated to do the one thing you want a story to do, get you interested in what’s going on and who it’s happening to. However much it’s hewn from stone, this comic doesn’t care about being ground breaking, it doesn’t want you to praise the creator’s skill either. It wants you to enjoy the story it’s going to tell you and it puts a whole lot of effort into delivering that.

Page 12 - Single inky panel goodness

All this detail filling up pages. Fluid organic lines, straight hatching, spotted blacks. It could be a mess, indistinct and impossible to pick apart. But it’s never like the work loses focus. You know where everyone is, every group feels like a mob or a mass where they need to. The motion feels swift or sedate, you know the pace it’s happening. The character designs are purposeful, revealing, they show you the nature of the person. Not by making bad guys grotesque, and good beautiful, remember they’re all hewn from stone. They’re all grotesque here in a way; lumpen, fluid, warped; but the nature of the person shows through in line, a graceful line showing a graceful nature and stance, body language that can be read and understood. This is good character design, good draughtsmanship, skill and ability turning in a story that can be read as fluidly as it’s drawn.

This is great cartooning in the hands of a thoughtful practitioner. You’ll see melodramatic poses, but they’ll not feel out of place, they’re the tone of the work not the nature of the artist, if that makes sense. Put another way, there’s no artist making great pin-up poses to signify a point where you SHOULD feel a certain way. The artist delivers art that makes you understand, that holds your hand into the emotions of those in the story, even if those emotions are of a grand nature. That grand nature is the character’s.

The story is, again, a beautiful pattern. It’s clever, its genre for sure. It knows its genre and the history behind it. You could call on Elric as a predecessor, and Conan. You might think of Grimjaw if you know of it and all those ‘magic came back to the world when science died’ books – ‘Sword of Shannara’ is what I think of when I think of any of these things, maybe you’ll think of ‘Adventure Time’. But it’s most definitely none of those things. It’s funny and intentionally so. It gross and intentionally so. It’s pompous and intentionally so. Those are its strengths – it’s not trying to make you believe this is like reality. Its hewing its own reality from the crags and rocks filling its world. You’re meant to get in there and enjoy this world, not by the power of how much like reality it is, not by copying tropes and hoping they’ll trigger your learnt behaviours, but by the power of the story telling, the power of the art. Page 7 - Full Page SpreadThe sense of just feeling like this is someone who knows what they’re doing and they’re going to do it with skill and with fun and deliver some fine entertainment along the way.

Let’s be clear here, so far, we are seeing fun entertainment, there’s no depth of commentary on the real world. This is imagination at work creating a new cloth, a new pattern that looks fine and feels fine and is beautiful in how it flows and because of all of that, it makes you feel good, feel like you just want to wrap yourself up in it and stay there all day.

The Short List – Warglitter Zines

Warglitter Zines is our first responder in this twice weekly series.

We ask 5 questions aiming to understand the creator’s practice, aspirations and inspirations

Warglitter on youtube                    Warglitter Zines                      Order Warglitter’s Zine

ZL – You run a zine making group, how does that influence what you make and what made you want to start it in the first place?

WZ – I started a zine making club at the school where I teach. We had a rough year last spring and a coworker suggested I start a club. He said, on the hard days, he was always able to look forward to the club he runs because it was his time for sharing his passion with students who are actually interested. Late in the spring semester, it occurred to me that I should start a zine club. I talked it up in my classes and students are starting to learn about it by word of mouth. It’s pretty cool.

It does affect the kinds of stuff I put out there. I made the Carly Rae Jepsen Fanzine because I wanted to have an example I could show my students of different things you could try in a zine. I made the quiz and the mad libs because I remember seeing that kind of thing in teen magazines and enjoying them when I was growing up.

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I wrote Guilt because that was a story from my own life that I always wanted to tell and I thought my students could relate to it. Usually, my fiction comes out very sinister and I didn’t want to share any of those stories or my poetry with them. Because I started the zine club, I chose to follow some ideas that I wouldn’t have usually. I thought I needed something wholesome to show them, so I made the opposite of what I’m usually inspired to make, and I really loved the process and the final results.

 

ZL – Do you remember the first time?

WZ – One of my earliest memories is of the music video for ‘Take On Me’ by a-ha.  I was probably 3 or 4 years old and I was just transfixed by it. I didn’t see that video again until late at night in the mid-90’s. I think they actually showed it on Liquid Television, late night animation programming on MTV. There was no way I could have, but I felt like I had instinctively understood how that video was made as a toddler. Something about the live action world intersecting with the comic book world made sense to me. That moment when he reaches out of the comic book and the girl in the diner takes his hand is still just electrifying for me.

I really love music videos and actually use them in the classroom. There’s just something about that marriage of music and images that cuts me to my core. I can feel it in my solar plexus. A lot of music videos make me cry.

 

ZL – Given an unlimited budget and all the time in the world, what would be the project you’d make to be remembered by?

WZ – I don’t know, probably a one-night-only performance art event with some kind of giant multimedia collage and an interpretive dance routine going on simultaneously. And a lot of glitter. Barbra Streisand would stand next to it and she’d have to pretend to be very nice to people all night.

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Jens Lekman portriat by Warglitter

ZL – You’ve included a couple of drawings in the zines you have made and they’ve all been awesome, why don’t your zines include more art from you?

WZ – I think the Carly zine might be the only one I’ve made that doesn’t have something I drew in it, and that’s because I was really going for a more classic collage aesthetic but like the squeaky-clean version of that.

I doodle a lot, but I’ve never really had a good drawing practice. I kind of go through phases. Every once in a while, I tell myself I’m going to practice drawing every day and get REALLY good at it, but it never lasts long. I’ve always had a lot of different hobbies and creative outlets, but I’ve never really been aces at any one thing.

 

ZL – I know you talked a little about this on your initial Warglitter videos on YouTube, but some people may not have seen those, so, what made you want to do video reviews of zines?

WZ – I wanted to start a YouTube channel, but I never knew what to talk about. I felt like if I didn’t have something to offer people, no one would watch. Near the end of last summer, I started searching YouTube for channels devoted to talking about zines and I was really surprised at how few there were. And the zine videos with the most views weren’t even made by people with channels devoted to zines. I thought, ‘here are a few people who really care about something I’m interested in, and there aren’t so many people already talking about this that I would have to worry about getting views or filling my channel with content. We could just be a little community of people who are in it for love rather than money or notoriety.’ So the most obvious way for me to start, it seemed, was to review zines I was buying or getting from people through trades.

 

all art copyright and trademark it's respective owners. 
content copyright iestyn pettigrew 2019

Zine Love 2019

Hello

This site is here to celebrate things that I or others truly love in the zine, self-publishing and small press world.

We aim to delve into what we love and why, whether it’s people or styles; pages, pictures or panels; storylines or drawing lines this is about describing what we find awesome.

There’ll  be interviews, deep reviews and hopefully discussion.  If you have something you want to talk about, get in touch because this is a community space to share your love. Guidelines are simple, no plot synopsis, minimum 500 words. Tell us WHY YOU LOVE it not what happens.

All the best

iestyn